Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jasmine: Hej och god morgon. Jasmine here.
Morten: Hej, allihopa. This is Morten and you're listening to SwedishPod101.com Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 5 - Which Languages Do You Speak in Sweden?
Jasmine: We have an exciting lesson ahead of us today.
Morten: Yes, as usual.
Jasmine: In this lesson, we will look at how to talk about the languages you speak and the ones you're learning.
Morten: The conversation takes place on a soccer field just outside the Ostkupan student halls in Kallebäck.
Jasmine: Our main characters are once again, James and Anders.
Morten: Anders is at the hall as part of his job for the IO. He sees James play soccer with some other people and walks up and talks to him.
Jasmine: This is now official match, just to kick about. James is taking a quick breather.
Morten: This is a casual encounter, so the situation has as you can imagine, very little formality. Let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Anders: Hej, James. Du spelar bra.
James: Tack Anders. Många här spelar bra, men jag förstår inte allas språk.
Anders: Jaså, hurså?
James: De där pratar franska. De talar ingen svenska och mycket lite engelska.
Anders: Jaha, vad kul, så många språk. Själv studerar jag spanska och japanska.
James: Oj, vad intressant. Då talar du många språk.
Anders: Nej, inte än. Min spanska är okej, men min japanska är fortfarande svag.
James: Som min svenska...
Anders: Nej, du talar ju nästan flytande.
Morten: And now let’s hear it slowly.
Jasmine: Nu ska vi lyssna på den sakta versionen.
Anders: Hej, James. Du spelar bra.
James: Tack Anders. Många här spelar bra, men jag förstår inte allas språk.
Anders: Jaså, hurså?
James: De där pratar franska. De talar ingen svenska och mycket lite engelska.
Anders: Jaha, vad kul, så många språk. Själv studerar jag spanska och japanska.
James: Oj, vad intressant. Då talar du många språk.
Anders: Nej, inte än. Min spanska är okej, men min japanska är fortfarande svag.
James: Som min svenska...
Anders: Nej, du talar ju nästan flytande.
Morten: And now, once more time with the translation.
Jasmine: Och en gång till med översättningen.
Anders: Hej, James. Du spelar bra.
Morten: Hello, James. You're a good player.
James: Tack Anders. Många här spelar bra, men jag förstår inte allas språk.
Morten: Thanks, Anders. Many here are good players, but I don't understand everyone's languages.
Anders: Jaså, hurså?
Morten: OK, how come?
James: De där pratar franska. De talar ingen svenska och mycket lite engelska.
Morten: Those there speak French. They speak no Swedish and very little English.
Anders: Jaha, vad kul, så många språk. Själv studerar jag spanska och japanska.
Morten: Really, so many languages. I am studying Spanish and Japanese myself.
James: Oj, vad intressant. Då talar du många språk.
Morten: Oh, how interesting. You speak many languages.
Anders: Nej, inte än. Min spanska är okej, men min japanska är fortfarande svag.
Morten: No, not yet. My Spanish is OK, but my Japanese is still weak.
James: Som min svenska...
Morten: Like my Swedish...
Anders: Nej, du talar ju nästan flytande.
Morten: No, you speak almost fluently.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Morten: James is playing soccer with many other international students, isn't he?
Jasmine: Well, we don't know. They could be exchange students, but they may also be Swedes with immigrant backgrounds.
Morten: Are there a lot of foreigners in Sweden?
Jasmine: Foreigners, I wouldn't exactly call them that. They are people with other language backgrounds living in Sweden.
Morten: Okay, so integration has been successful in Sweden.
Jasmine: Well, what does that mean successful? Sweden has about 15% of people with immigrant backgrounds of some sort.
Morten: But most of them speak Swedish when answered about?
Jasmine: I suppose that depends, but generally yes.
Morten: So they speak Swedish and in school they study?
Jasmine: In school everyone studies Swedish and English plus at least one other foreign language.
Morten: Like French or German?
Jasmine: Yes, these are the traditional languages, but in recent years Spanish has become increasingly popular.
Morten: And I hear even Asian languages like Chinese and Japanese.
Jasmine: Yeah, that's true. On top of that, pupils from a non-Swedish speaking background usually get hemspråksundervisning.
Morten: So that means they are instructed in their native language?
Jasmine: Yes, only a few hours per week and sometimes there are not enough students or no teachers.
Morten: Yes, I heard. There are more than a hundred languages spoken on Swedish school yards.
Jasmine: That's right.
Morten: So what about the level of English that people have in Sweden?
Jasmine: Generally around 90% of Swedes speak English.
Morten: You have a lot of TV in English with subtitles, don't you?
Jasmine: Yes and English is very popular.
Morten: So if you don't speak Swedish as a visitor to Sweden but can make yourself understood in English, that's all right?
Jasmine: Absolutely, in most cases, you'll be just fine.
Morten: And now, let's move on to the vocabulary section.
VOCAB LIST
First we have.
Jasmine: Förstår (förstå) [natural native speed]
Morten: To understand.
Jasmine: Förstår (förstå) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Förstår (förstå) [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Ett språk [natural native speed]
Morten: A language.
Jasmine: Ett språk [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Ett språk [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Talar (tala) [natural native speed]
Morten: To speak.
Jasmine: Talar (tala) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Talar (tala) [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have
Jasmine: Pratar (prata) [natural native speed]
Morten: To talk or to speak.
Jasmine: Pratar (prata) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Pratar (prata) [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Studerar (studera) [natural native speed]
Morten: To study.
Jasmine: Studerar (studera) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Studerar (studera) [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Franska [natural native speed]
Morten: French.
Jasmine: Franska [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Franska [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Svenska [natural native speed]
Morten: Swedish.
Jasmine: Svenska [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Svenska [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Engelska [natural native speed]
Morten: English.
Jasmine: Engelska [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Engelska [natural native speed]
Morten: And finally, we have.
Jasmine: Japanska [natural native speed]
Morten: Japanese.
Jasmine: Japanska [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Japanska [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Morten: Let's take a closer look at the words and phrases from this lesson. In this lesson, we're focusing on a conversational phrase.
Jasmine: That's right, practical everyday stuff again.
Morten: If you want to express your enthusiastic approval of what's just been said, you can say?
Jasmine: vad kul
Morten: Meaning, how cool or how fascinating. Literally it means, how fun. So if I told you I made lot of friends at a party, listeners, what would you reply? [pause].
Jasmine: Yes, that's right, vad kul.
Morten: This phrase is often used with small interjections like no and O.
Jasmine: Nej vad kul, Åh vad kul! So if I tell you that I found a new job, what would you listeners say?
Morten: Vad kul or Nej vad kul.
Jasmine: Our next phrase is also very common and useful to know.
Morten: It's about getting the other person to confirm what they've just said.
Jasmine: Say you tell me about your vintage car and the trip you're planning to take it on. I might say.
Morten: vad kul, how cool. And if I tell you I'm going on holiday to Australia tomorrow, you will say once again?
Jasmine: Vad kul.
Morten: So, I say, Jag pratar japanska.
Jasmine: Nej vad kul!
Morten: Tack. Thanks a lot.

Lesson focus

And now, let's move on to the grammar section. In this lesson, we're all about languages and their names in Swedish.
Jasmine: We've already taken a look on countries and nationalities. Fortunately names of languages are a lot easier.
Morten: I'm sure you remember there are two different ways to say that you're English or French.
Jasmine: Jag är fransman or Jag är fransk.
Morten: I am Frenchman or I am French.
Jasmine: Yeah. And then Jag är fransk you already have the basic ingredient for saying the French language.
Morten: As we heard in the dialogue, that is?
Jasmine: Franska. Jag talar franska.
Morten: What about not speaking a language, how can I say I don't speak Swedish?
Jasmine: Jag talar inte svenska
Morten: Please listen and repeat. Jag talar inte svenska
Jasmine: Jag talar inte svenska. But you already speak a little, so you could say?
Morten: Jag talar lite svenska.
Jasmine: I speak a little Swedish. Please repeat after me, Jag talar lite svenska
Morten: Jag talar lite svenska. And what about other languages, how can we know what to call them?
Jasmine: Well, thankfully the names of languages are more regular than those of countries or nationalities.
Morten: But still not absolutely regular, right?
Jasmine: Tyvärr, unfortunately, that is correct.
Morten: In that case, let's cover a few more languages. How about German?
Jasmine: Jag talar tyska.
Morten: I speak German. What about Japanese?
Jasmine: Jag talar japanska.
Morten: Or I speak a little Spanish?
Jasmine: Jag talar lite spanska
Morten: Please listen again and repeat.
Jasmine: Jag talar lite spanska
Morten: Very good, I speak a little Spanish.
Jasmine: And if you want to say that you don't speak a language, put in the word inte.
Morten: This word means not or in this case don't. Another useful word. Can we see it in action?
Jasmine: Jag talar inte engelska
Morten: I don't speak English, something you will hopefully not hear in Sweden.
Jasmine: Right, that's unlikely. Plus…
Morten: When you get to Sweden or the next time you meet a Swedish person…
Jasmine: You will already speak some Swedish.
Morten: So practice what we've learned so far and impress those Swedes.
Jasmine: For impress, they will be. Listeners, do you know the reason flashcards are so popular?
Morten: It's because they work.
Jasmine: We've taken this time tested studying tool and modernized it with my word bank flashcards.
Morten: Learn vocabulary using your eyes and ears.
Jasmine: It's simple and powerful. Save difficult and interesting words to your personal vocabulary list called my word bank.
Morten: Master words in your my word bank by practicing with flashcards.
Jasmine: Words in my word bank come with audio, so you learn proper pronunciation…
Morten: …while you learn to recognize words by sight.
Jasmine: Go to SwedishPod101.com now and try my word bank and flashcards today.
Morten: Thanks for this lesson. Tack, allihopa. Hejdå
Jasmine: Tack. Hejdå.

46 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Hello! How many languages do you speak?

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Thursday at 11:32 am
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Hej Gary,

Tack så mycket för din positiva feedback! Det blir vi väldigt glada över att höra! (Thank you very much for your positive feedback! That makes us really happy to hear!)


Here are some answers to your questions. 😇


1) "En liten" means "a small" or "a little" and is used in front of a noun. For example. En liten hund. (A small dog.) "Lite" is used as a measurement and can be translated to "little" or "some". For example: Jag vill bara ha lite kaffe. (I only want a little coffee.) The main difference is that one is used as a measurement, so you would say "Jag kan tala lite svenska."


2) You can use both of these, and they are used just as much. "Jag kan lite svenska" is a little more informal and relaxed.


3) Yes, you're right. We usually use "prata" when we mean "talk" since "tala" is quite formal. You would not usually say "Jag talar med en vän. (I'm speaking with a friend.)


Please let us know if you have any other questions!


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

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Gary Poole
Sunday at 11:24 pm
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Hej SwedishPod101!


Jag har just nu börja lära mig svenska och jag måste säga att jag tycker er lektioner är utmärkta och de är verkligen hjälpa mig med att förstå språket ?


(I have just now starting to learn Swedish and I have to say that I think your lessons are excellent and they are really helping me to understand the language)


Jag har tre frågor (på engelska).


1) Firstly, is there a difference between 'lite' and 'en liten' when used in, "Jag kan tala lite (en liten) svenska." ?


2) I believe that it is possible to swap "kan tala" with just 'kan' - "Jag kan lite svenska (I know a little Swedish)". Is this more or less common that 'Jag kan tala lite svenka' ?


3) I notice from the notes that prata can be translated as both, to talk / speak. Given that tala is translated as, to speak, would it be more common to use prata for to talk ?


(Förresten, kan jag tala också franska.)


Tack så mycket !


Hälsningar


Gary

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 7:57 pm
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Hej Diana,

Wow, det är verkligen imponerande! (That's really impressive!) ?


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

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Diana
Thursday at 6:49 am
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Hej allihopa. Jag är ny här. Jag talar bulgariska, franska, engelska, ryska och lite tyska och svenska. Jag hoppas att förbättra min svenska snabbt när jag vill flytta till Sverige snart. Jag önskar dig en trevlig kväll och en bra vecka. :D

Vi ses!

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Swedishpod101.com
Tuesday at 12:01 am
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Hej Ali Khan,

Välkommen till Swedishpod101.com (Welcome to Swedishpod101.com) Jag heter Vicky, trevligt att träffas! (My name is Vicky, nice to meet you!) :innocent: Säg till om du har några frågor. (Let us know if you have any questions.)


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

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Ali Khan
Tuesday at 8:10 pm
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Hi everyone how are you all ? and I am new here. I have lots of problem in Swedish Language but I want to make my Swedish . fi you can pleas help me . thanks Ali khan

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Swedishpod101.com
Monday at 9:47 pm
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Hej Kay,

Inga problem! Säg till om du har några frågor. (No problems! Let us know if you have any questions.) :wink:


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

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Kay
Tuesday at 9:40 pm
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Hej Vicky,

tack för du förklarade för mig!

Thank you for explaining it to me.

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Swedishpod101.com
Monday at 10:57 pm
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Hi Kay,

Yes, that is correct. We would say "Jag talar dålig engleska." (I speak English badly/poorly.) Or: I'm bad at tennis. (Jag är dålig på tennis.) We use the word "svag" mainly when speaking about physical strength, we can also use "svag" when speaking about materials that aren't strong. For example a branch that could easily break is "svag" (weak).


I hope this helped.


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

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Kay
Tuesday at 10:28 pm
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Jag talar thailändska, engelska och lite kinesiska.


Also, my boyfriend told me that using "weak" to describe someone's language skill, the more correct term would be "dålig" rather than svag. Could you please explain what the difference is?