Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Elin: Hej allihopa! I’m Elin.
Becky: Hi everyone, I’m Becky. Welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 10 - Have You Done All the Swedish Housework? In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make passive voice sentences using the past participle.
Elin: The conversation takes place in Emma and David’s apartment.
Becky: It’s between Emma and her partner David, and they are using informal Swedish, since they are a couple.
Elin: Great! Let's listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Poor Emma, she was the one who did all the housework. Is it typical for the woman in a relationship to do all the housework, Elin?
Elin: No, I would say that generally, it’s more equal.
Becky: Yes that’s what I thought, I mean, you always hear how equal things are between the sexes in Sweden.
Elin: Well, it’s true that Sweden is known as a country where inequalities between the sexes are not as great as in many other countries. But that doesn’t mean that there’s no difference in how much housework, and what kind of housework women and men do.
Becky: Tell me more!
Elin: Well, recent studies, for example, show that women on average spend 2 hours a day doing housework such as cleaning, cooking and doing laundry, while men on average spend about 1 hour.
Becky: Aren’t there some other types of housework that men do more than women?
Elin: Yes, men do more housework like repairing things around the house, walking and taking care of family pets, and gardening.
Becky: And how much time do they spend on that?
Elin: On average 40 minutes a day, while women spend around 20 minutes a day on the same type of housework.
Becky: I see, but that actually means that women spend more time on housework on average than men do!
Elin: Yes that’s right, but that will hopefully change with time. Now let’s move on to vocab.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Elin: The first word that we need to talk about is the interjection “va”, meaning “what” or “eh”.
Becky: And what’s so special about that?
Elin: The reason we’re bringing it up, is that Swedes in their daily conversations, are sometimes a bit careless of how they pronounce certain words.
Becky: What words?
Elin: Words such as the pronoun “vad” meaning “what”, and the adverb “var” meaning “where”, can often be pronounced so that they sound like “va”, and this might cause some confusion for non-native speakers.
Becky: Ok, what do you have for us next?
Elin: Next up I have the verb “att sluta”, meaning “to get off”.
Becky: And that was used in this lesson when Emma talked about getting off work earlier, saying,” I was able to get off earlier, so I have already done that”.
Elin: Precisely, and that was, “jag kunde sluta tidigare, så jag har redan gjort allt”.
Becky: So this verb can be used when we talk about “getting off” things like work.
Elin: Yes, but the verb “att sluta” can also mean “to quit” or “to stop”.
Becky: I see. So how would you say, “You should stop smoking”?
Elin: “Du borde sluta röka”.
Becky: And how about “stop screaming”.
Elin: “sluta skrika”
Becky: Now let’s move on to the grammar!
GRAMMAR POINT
Elin: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make passive voice sentences using the past participle.
Becky: Let’s first look at some of the sentences from the dialogue, that are passive voice sentences. We had sentences like, “The laundry is washed”, “the dishes are washed” and “the floors are vacuumed”.
Elin: And those were “tvätten är tvättad”, disken är diskad” and “golven är damsugna” respectively. Let’s start by reviewing the difference between an active voice sentence, and a passive voice sentence.
Becky: Sure. In an active voice sentence, the subject carries out the activity the verb is describing. In the active voice sentence, “Lisa is vacuuming the floors”, Lisa is the subject that’s carrying out the activity the verb is describing, in this case, Lisa is vacuuming floors.
Elin: That’s right.
Becky: In a passive voice sentence like “the floors are vacuumed by Lisa”, the subject of the active voice sentence, in this case, “Lisa” has instead become the agent of the sentence, which is marked with the preposition “by”. The object of the passive voice sentence, in this case “the floors”, has instead become the subject of the sentence.
Elin: Ok, now, let’s move on to forming the past participle.
Becky: One thing we need to know about the past participle in general, is that when we use the past participle in a passive voice sentence, we also need to use an auxiliary verb. Elin, what are those?
Elin: There are two auxiliary verbs you can use, but in this lesson, we’ll only cover the auxiliary verb “att vara” in its present tense form “är” meaning “is”/”are”.
Becky: You should know that the past participle in Swedish can be created from the supine form of a verb, but the past participle behaves in a similar way to Swedish adjectives. This means that they change their endings depending on whether they are referring to a common or neuter gender noun, and whether the noun is in its definite plural form.
Elin: That’s right. But, keep in mind that we are only going through the past participle that can be used in passive voice sentences. So we won’t cover all the aspects of the past participle in this lesson.
Becky: Now listeners, I know this might seem a bit overwhelming, but let’s go through it step-by-step so it’s more clear. Let’s look at how to form the past participle out of the supine form of a verb.
Elin: We will start with the first group of verbs that conjugate in the regular way, and have a supine form that ends in –at, “a”, “t”.
Becky: What are some example of verbs from this group?
Elin: Verbs such as “städat” meaning “cleaned”, “ritat” meaning “drawn”, and “bokat” meaning “booked”.
Becky: And how do you change these verbs to their past participle?
Elin: When they’re referring to a neuter gender noun, these verbs don’t take an ending - they are exactly the same as their supine form.
Becky: So how would you say, “the house is cleaned”.
Elin: You would use the verb “städat”, which is the same in its supine and past participle forms, and say “huset är städat”. Listeners, repeat after me.
Elin: “Huset är städat”[pause].
Becky: How about if the verb is referring to a common gender noun instead?
Elin: Then the supine form of the verb drops its final –t and you add a –d.
Becky: So how would you say, “the car is cleaned”?
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “bilen är städad”. [pause].
Becky: And what about when the verb is referring to a noun in its definite plural form?
Elin: Then the supine form of the verb drops its final –t, and you add the ending –de.
Becky: So how would you say, “the rooms are cleaned”?
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “rummen är städade”. [pause].
Becky: Okay, let’s move on to the second group of verbs that conjugate regularly. Here we have two subgroups of verbs - the ones with a verb stem that ends in a voiced consonant, and those with a verb stem that ends in an unvoiced consonant. Let’s start with first group! Do you have an example Elin?
Elin: We have the verb “att hänga” meaning “to hang”, which in its supine form is “hängt”.
Becky: And how does this change to its past participle when referring to a neuter gender noun?
Elin: It doesn’t, so “hängt” remains “hängt”.
Becky: So how would you say, “the drape is hung up”?
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “lakanet är hängt”. [pause].
Becky: And how about when it’s referring to a common gender noun?
Elin: When referring to a common gender noun, the supine form of the verb drops its final -t, and you add a -d to its ending. So “hängt” becomes “hängd”.
Becky: So how would you say, “the laundry is hung up”?
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “tvätten är hängd”. [pause].
Becky: And what about when the verb is referring to a noun in its definite plural form?
Elin: Then, the supine form of the verb drops its final -t and you add the ending -da.
Becky: So how would you say, “the curtains are hung up”
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “Gardinerna är hängda”. [pause].
Becky: Let’s move on to the second subgroup of verbs that have verb stems that end in an unvoiced consonant. Elin, what’s a verb from this group?
Elin: The verb “att köpa” meaning “to buy”, and the supine of this is “köpt”. These verbs are a bit different, because they don't take any endings in their past participle form, when they are referring to a neuter or a common gender noun.
Becky: That’s great news! But how would you say, “the ticket is bought” in Swedish?
Elin: Listeners repeat after me! “Biljetten är köpt” [pause].
Becky: And how would you say, “the house is bought”?
Elin: Listeners repeat after me! “Huset är köpt”.[pause].
Becky: What about when the verb is referring to a noun in its definite plural form?
Elin: Then, the supine forms of the verbs add the ending –a, “a”.
Becky: So how would you say, “the flowers are bought”?[pause].
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “Blommorna är köpta”.
Becky: Okay, let’s move on to the third and final group of verbs that conjugate regularly, those that have a supine form that ends in a –tt, double “t”.
Elin: And here you have the verb “att sno” meaning “to steal”, which in its supine form is “snott”.
Becky: And how would you change these verbs into their past participle, when they’re referring to a neuter gender noun?
Elin: In that case, these verbs take no ending.
Becky: So how would you say, ”the necklace is stolen”?
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “Halsbandet är snott”. [pause].
Becky: And what about when the verb is referring to a common gender noun?
Elin: Then, the supine form of the verb drops its final -tt double “t” and you add a -dd, double “d” to its ending.
Becky: So how would you say, “the car is stolen”?
Elin: Listeners, repeat after me! “Bilen är snodd”. [pause].
Becky: And how about when the verb is referring to a noun in its definite plural form?
Elin: Then, the supine form of the verb drops its final -tt double “t” and you add the ending -dda double “d”, “a”.
Becky: So how would you say, “the diamonds are stolen”?
Elin: “Diamanterna är snodda”. [pause].
Becky: Ok, good job everyone! Listeners, make sure you check the lesson notes to reinforce what you’ve learned in this lesson.

Outro

Becky: Okay that’s it for this lesson. Thanks for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time.
Elin: Hej då!

11 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

user profile picture
SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Who does the housework in your home?

user profile picture
Swedishpod101.com
Monday at 11:56 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Chris,

The word "disk" doesn't change between plural and singular. It's a little like the English word "sheep". "Disken" is the definite form of the word "disk" meaning it specifies what dishes the speaker is talking about.


Hope it helped.


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

user profile picture
Chris
Monday at 1:02 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hejsan!


Jag har en fråga. I texten står den följande:


"Disken är diskad." med översättning "The dishes are washed."


Översättningen verkar vara i den plurala formen (the dishes). Men på svenska verkar det vara i den singulara formen, annars skulle det vara "disken är diskade", eller hur?


Min fråga är därför, är ordet "disken" singular eller plural?


Chris

user profile picture
Swedishpod101.com
Monday at 11:48 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Erika,

Thank you for your feedback. We are sorry about that mistake. We have a lot of lessons and material on this webpage and it sometimes happens that we lose a letter along the way. We will fix this as quickly as we can.


Best Regards,

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

user profile picture
Erika
Sunday at 6:43 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

You forgot to fix "damsugna".. Det är så löjligt av såna fel.

user profile picture
SwedishPod101.com
Saturday at 9:14 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej hej Yolande!


Jag hatar också att diska! Det är riktigt tråkigt, eller hur? Har du diskmaskin?


Din böjning av "svår" är lite fel. Den korrekta böjningen vore "svårare".


Ha det bra!

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

user profile picture
Yolande Brunelle
Wednesday at 2:32 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Engla,

Jag städar av mig själv, och jag hatar att diska.

Det är svårtare och svårtare att dammsuga golven allt eftersom jag blir äldre.

Kanske borde jag be hjälpen snart...!


Hej så länge!

Yolande

user profile picture
SwedishPod101.com
Friday at 2:34 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Gary!


Thank you so much for letting us know!


We fixed it!

Cheers,

Satsuki Team SwedishPod101.com

user profile picture
Gary
Thursday at 4:10 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Satsuki


Just to let you know that the verb, "att dammsuga" has been misspelt as "att damsuga" in the vocabulary section.


Hälsningar


Gary

user profile picture
SwedishPod101.com
Saturday at 2:00 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Gary!


Thank you for your comment and great work with the sentences!


One thing that might be good to know is that in Swedish you would not really use expressions like "would like to think" (skulle vilja tro) as you use it in English. I would instead suggest you use "att tycka" or "att anse" to say that your wife is of the opinion that she does all the house work.


Maybe you would like to try to re-write the sentence and use one of those verbs?


Keep up the excellent work!


Cheers,

Satsuki Team SwedishPod101.com

user profile picture
Gary
Friday at 4:39 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej !


Min fru skulle vilja tro att hon gör allt hushållsarbete :smile:


Dock, städar jag noggrant huset varje vecka :innocent:


Hälsningar


Gary