Dialogue - Swedish

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Vocabulary

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dag day
från from
vilken what
att boka to book
att vilja to want
kosta to cost
rum room
att checka in to check in
komma come
när when

Lesson Notes

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Grammar

The Focus of This Lesson Is the Usage of the Modal Verb Vill and Verbs in the Present Tense.
...jag vill boka ett rum.
"...I want to book a room."


Since the overall focus of this lesson is to learn how to make a hotel reservation in Swedish, the key phrase that has been selected is the one above where we express a wish, in this case the wish to book a room. Forming these kinds of sentences might seem difficult at a first glance, but as you will find, the structure of these sentences is quite straightforward.

Let us first look at the verbs in the above sentence. There are two verbs, att vilja (to want) and att boka ("to book"), that appear in the sentence. The first verb is a modal verb, and here it is put in in its present tense form, vill ("want"). It might be good to know that vill does not change in its present tense: it stays the same for all persons. It is followed by the verb att boka ("to book"), which is here put in its infinitive form but without its preposition "to." This sentence structure is not only useful when you want to make a hotel reservation but also for all other situations when you want to express a desire to do something. Let us look at some examples of sentences that use this structure.

For Example:

  1. Jag vill äta pannkakor.
    "I want to eat pancakes."
  2. Han vill åka till USA.
    "He wants to go to the U.S."
  3. De vill resa till Sverige.
    "They want to travel to Sweden."
  4. Vi vill checka in nu.
    "We want to check in now."


The Use of Present Tense Verbs in Swedish


In this lesson's dialogue, there are also some other verbs present, namely är, heter, kommer, and kostar. There are certain general rules for how to form present tense verbs in Swedish, and we will come back to them at a later stage, but for now, we will only focus on the situations when we use verbs in their present tense. We can divide the situations that verbs in their present tense describe into three categories. Most commonly, present tense is explained as a tense that describes something that is or are happening right now. Present tense can, however, also describe something that usually happens but also something that will happen in the future.

Cultural Insights

Hotel Rooms in Sweden


In this lesson, we have learned how to make a hotel reservation. Here, we made the reservation over the phone, but if you find it easier, you can also make a hotel reservation over the Internet. However, actually calling the hotel yourself is a great way of practicing your Swedish, so next time why don't you give it a try? Of course, there are other benefits to calling the hotel yourself: for example, this will allow you to ask more detailed questions about check-in and checkout times and about what is included in the price.

Breakfast is, for the most part, included in the price when booking a hotel room in Sweden. What is actually served naturally varies, but most hotels in Sweden serve a continental-style breakfast, which might be a great opportunity to try some Swedish delicacies.

As for checkout times, this is something that some hotels might be flexible with, so if you need your room for a few more hours, make sure to ask.

Lesson Transcript

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INTRODUCTION
Alisha: Hi Everyone, this is Alisha: and welcome to SwedishPod101.com. This is Beginner season 1, lesson one, Reserving a Swedish Hotel Room.
Satsuki: Hej allihopa! I’m Satsuki.
Alisha: Was that a Swedish greeting, Satsuki?
Satsuki: Oh, yes. I said ‘Hej allihopa’. ‘Hej’ means “hello” in Swedish and ‘allihopa’ means “everyone”. So ‘hej allihopa’ is “hi everyone”.
Alisha: Well, that sounds like a great way to greet our listeners, I’ll remember that! So what are we learning in this lesson?
Satsuki: In this lesson we will learn how to make a hotel reservation using the modal verb ‘vill’.
Alisha: The conversation is between Lisa, who is from the US, and Sara, a hotel receptionist. It is over the phone and since Lisa and Sara don’t know each other, the conversation is in formal Swedish.
Satsuki: Great! Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Hotel receptionist: Hotell Blåsippan. Det här är Sara.
Lisa: Hej. Jag heter Lisa Smith och jag vill boka ett rum.
Hotel receptionist: Vilken dag kommer du?
Lisa: Jag kommer på lördag.
Hotel receptionist Det kostar 900 kronor. Vill du boka det?
Lisa: Ja tack. När kan jag checka in?
Hotel receptionist: Du kan checka-in från klockan12
Lisa: Okej. Tack så mycket.
Hotel receptionist: Tack!
Alisha: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Hotel receptionist: Hotell Blåsippan. Det här är Sara.
Lisa: Hej. Jag heter Lisa Smith och jag vill boka ett rum.
Hotel receptionist: Vilken dag kommer du?
Lisa: Jag kommer på lördag.
Hotel receptionist: Det kostar 900 kronor. Vill du boka det?
Lisa: Ja tack. När kan jag checka in?
Hotel receptionist: Du kan checka-in från klockan12
Lisa: Okej. Tack så mycket.
Hotel receptionist: Tack!
Alisha: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Hotel receptionist: Hotell Blåsippan. Det här är Sara.
Alisha: Hotel Blåsippan. This is Sara speaking.
Lisa: Hej. Jag heter Lisa Smith och jag vill boka ett rum.
Alisha: Hi. My name is Lisa Smith and I want to book a room.
Hotel receptionist: Vilken dag kommer du?
Alisha: What day are you coming?
Lisa: Jag kommer på lördag.
Alisha: I will come on Saturday.
Hotel receptionist: Det kostar 900 kronor. Vill du boka det?
Alisha: It costs 900 crowns. Would you like to book it?
Lisa: Ja tack. När kan jag checka in?
Alisha: Yes please. When can I check-in?
Hotel receptionist: Du kan checka-in från klockan12
Alisha: You can check in from 12 o'clock on Saturday.
Lisa Okej. Tack så mycket.
Alisha: Okay. Thank you so much.
Hotel receptionist Tack!
Alisha: Thank you!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Alisha: So, Satsuki, that was an interesting dialog with a lot of helpful phrases, but do I really have to call a hotel in Sweden to make a reservation? Can I not do it online?
Satsuki: Well, in most cases you can make a reservation online, but actually calling the hotel is a great opportunity for you to practice your Swedish.
Alisha: That’s true, and I guess you’ll also be able to ask any questions you might have.
Satsuki: Exactly!
Alisha: So when you book a hotel room in Sweden, what is actually included?
Satsuki: Breakfast is almost always included, but what is actually served varies. It is usually a continental style of breakfast which is a great opportunity to try some Swedish delicacies.
Alisha: And how about check-in and check-out times?
Satsuki: They are usually similar to other hotels, but if you want to check out a bit later you can always ask and they might be flexible.
Alisha: Great!
VOCAB LIST
Alisha :Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Satsuki: att boka [natural native speed]
Alisha: book
Satsuki: att boka [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: att boka [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: rum [natural native speed]
Alisha: room
Satsuki: rum [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: rum [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: vilken [natural native speed]
Alisha: what
Satsuki: vilken [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: vilken [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: komma [natural native speed]
Alisha: come
Satsuki: komma [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: komma [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: när [natural native speed]
Alisha: when
Satsuki: när [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: när [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: att checka in [natural native speed]
Alisha: check in
Satsuki: att checka in [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: att checka in [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: att vilja [natural native speed]
Alisha: want
Satsuki: att vilja [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: att vilja [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: kosta [natural native speed]
Alisha: to cost
Satsuki: kosta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: kosta [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: från [natural native speed]
Alisha: from
Satsuki: från [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: från [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki: dag [natural native speed]
Alisha: day
Satsuki: dag [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki: dag [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Alisha: Let’s us have a closer look at some of the vocabulary and phrases from this lesson.
Satsuki: We will start with the preposition ‘från’, which means “from”.
Alisha: Do you use this the same way as in English?
Satsuki: Yes, you do! If you remember in the dialog, ‘från’ is used before a specific time to refer to something that will happen from a certain point in time.
Alisha: Ah yes, I remember that the hotel receptionist said Lisa could “check in FROM 12 o’clock” right?
Satsuki: Right! She said ‘Du kan checka-in från klockan 12:00’.
Alisha: But if it works the same way as in English, can we also use it when we want to say we’re going “from” one place to another?
Satsuki: Definitely. If you want to say “from Stockholm to Gothenburg” you simply say ‘från Stockholm to Göteborg’.
Alisha: Ok, that is great to know! So what else are we going to look at?
Satsuki: I thought we could talk the verb ‘att boka’.
Alisha: Which means “to book”.
Satsuki: This is commonly used in Swedish when we say that we have booked a hotel room, or a table at a restaurant.
Alisha: Got it. So can we use it when we talk about other things like concert tickets, cinema tickets and theater tickets?
Satsuki: Yes, for all of those things, you can use the verb ‘att boka’.
Alisha: But isn't there another verb you can use as well?
Satsuki: There is! You can also use the verb ‘att reservera’ which means “to reserve” as a synonym for ‘att boka’.
Alisha: Good to know! Now let’s move on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Alisha:In this lesson, you'll learn how to use the modal verb “vill” and verbs in their present tense. Let’s look at one of the sentences from this lesson’s dialog.
Satsuki: It is the one where Lisa says “...I want to book a room”? which is ‘...jag vill boka ett rum’. Let’s look more closely at the two verbs that appear in this sentence.
Alisha:I think I need some help here, can you point them out?
Satsuki: Of course! The first verb that appears in the sentence is the modal verb ‘att vilja’ which means “to want”, and here it is in its present tense form, ‘vill’ .
Alisha: And what’s the second verb? Is it “to book”?
Satsuki: Yes, that’s right. The second verb is ‘att boka’.
Alisha: The listeners might be confused here, because the verb “to book” seems to be in its infinitive form, but there is no “to” in the Swedish sentence.
Satsuki: Good job spotting that! The infinitive form of the Swedish “to book” is actually ‘att boka’, but when you use a modal verb, the verbs that follow drop the ‘att’. Now let’s practice!
Alisha: Okay, so how would I say “I want to eat pancakes”?
Satsuki: That’s easy, we already know the first 2 words of that sentence right?
Alisha: Yes “I want”, but what was that in Swedish?
Satsuki:‘Jag vill’.
Alisha: Okay, but how do we say “to eat” in its infinitive form in Swedish?
Satsuki:‘Att äta’. But remember we drop the ‘att’ part before the verb. So we only say ‘äta’.
Alisha: And how do you say “pancakes” in Swedish?
Satsuki: That’s easy! “Pannkakor”.
Alisha: Okay so “I want to eat pancakes” becomes?
Satsuki:‘Jag vill äta pannkakor’!
Alisha: That was easy! Let’s do some more practice. Listeners, repeat after Satsuki.
Satsuki:‘Jag vill äta pannkakor.’ [pause]
Alisha: So how do I say “I want to go the US”?
Satsuki: Well you will start the sentence exactly as before with ‘Jag vill’ meaning “I want” and then you will use the Swedish word for “to go” which is ‘att åka’, but without the ‘att’.
Alisha: So I only use ‘åka’?
Satsuki: Yes. And then you have to say where you want to go and in this case you wanted to go to “the US” which translates to ‘till USA’. So altogether, it is ‘Jag vill åka till USA’?
Alisha: Ok, let’s practice this one too. Listeners, repeat after Satsuki.
Satsuki:‘Jag vill åka till USA.’ [pause]
Satsuki: Well that’s it for this lesson!
Alisha: Thank you for listening, and make sure to check the lesson notes. We’ll see you next time for some more useful phrases in Swedish!
Satsuki: Hej då.