Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Elin: Hej allihopa! I’m Elin.
Becky: Hi everyone, I’m Becky. Welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 20 - Which Swedish City is the Most Beautiful? In this lesson, you’ll learn how to change the ending of adjectives in relation to the noun they’re referring to.
Elin: The conversation takes place in the break room at Emma’s office.
Becky: It’s between Emma and her employee Anna. They’re using informal Swedish.
Elin: Great! Let's listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: It’s sounds like Anna really likes Uppsala!
Elin: Well that’s not really surprising, it’s truly a beautiful city and it’s pretty close to Stockholm so it’s possible to go there for a day.
Becky: I have heard that it’s a university city.
Elin: That’s right. Uppsala university is one of the oldest centers of higher education in Sweden, but it’s also the home of Peter-no-tail.
Becky: Peter who??
Elin: Peter-no-tail is a famous character from a Swedish children's book, with the same name.
Becky: I don’t think I have ever heard of it!
Elin: Well it’s probably most famous in Sweden, but the book has been published in other countries as well. The storyline of the book unfolds in Uppsala, and today there’s actually a Peter-no-tail walk in Uppsala, where you can go and see all the sites that appear in the book.
Becky: That sounds like fun!
Elin: It is, and it’s not uncommon for families or school groups to go to Uppsala for a day to do the Peter-no-tail walk.
Becky: Keep that travel tip in mind, listeners! Now, let’s move on to the vocabulary.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Elin: We’ll start with the noun “gång”, which meant “time” in the dialogue.
Becky: You mean when Emma says, “Maybe we can go there together sometime”?
Elin: Exactly, and that was, “vi kanske kan åka dit tillsammans någon gång.”
Becky: But this noun can also mean a number of other things, right?
Elin: Yes, it can also mean things like, “aisle”, “gait” and “race-walking”.
Becky: I see! So how would you say something like, “The bag is in the supermarket aisle?
Elin: “Väskan står i gången i affären”.
Becky: How would you say, “I instantly recognised Lisa because of her gait”?
Elin: Then you would say, “Jag kände omedelbart igen Lisa på grund av hennes gång”.
Becky: Finally, how would you say, “Martin competes in race-walking”?
Elin: “Martin tävlar i gång”.
Becky: Great! What’s next?
Elin: We have the expression “varför inte” which means “why not”.
Becky: And this was used in this lesson’s dialog by Anna when she said, “sure, why not”.
Elin: That’s right, and in Swedish that was “visst, varför inte”.
Becky: So this expression can be used when you want to state that you don't have any objections to a proposal that someone just made.
Elin: Yes, but you can also use it to question something that you have just been told.
Becky: I see, so if I were to ask you “are you coming to the party tonight” and you said, “no” ...
Elin: Then you would question that by saying, “varför inte” which means “why not”.
Becky: Ok! Now let’s move on to the grammar!
GRAMMAR POINT
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to change the endings of adjectives in relation to the noun they’re referring to. We’ll start by looking at the endings for adjectives that are referring to a common gender noun in their indefinite singular forms. Elin, how do their endings change?
Elin: Well, they don’t! The adjective stays in its dictionary form, when it’s referring to a common gender noun, in its indefinite singular.
Becky: That’s great news! What’s an example?
Elin: There’s two examples from this lesson’s dialog. One, where Anna uses the adjective “underbar” meaning “wonderful”, and the common gender noun “stad” meaning “city”.
Becky: You must mean when she says, “it’s a wonderful city”?
Elin: That’s right! And that was, “det är en underbar stad”. Listeners, repeat after me please.
Elin: “Det är en underbar stad” [pause].
Becky: What’s the second sentence?
Elin: It’s when Emma uses the adjective “vacker” meaning “beautiful”, when referring to the noun “stad” meaning “city”.
Becky: That must be when she says, “yes, Uppsala is really a beautiful city”.
Elin: Correct! It was “Ja, Uppsala är verkligen en vacker stad”.
Becky: Listeners, repeat after Elin!
Elin: “Ja, Uppsala är verkligen en vacker stad”[pause].
Becky: Now, let’s move on to the adjectives that are instead referring to neuter gender nouns in their indefinite singular form. What ending do they take?
Elin: They take the ending “t”, –t.
Becky: Can you give us an example?
Elin: Of course! Let’s look at a sentence that again uses the adjective “underbar” meaning “wonderful”. But this time, we’ll let this adjective refer to a neuter gender noun, in its indefinite singular form. Let’s take the neuter gender noun “ett brev” which means “a letter”.
Becky: Okay, how about this sentence, “Malin wrote a wonderful letter”?
Elin: That’s “Malin skrev ett underbart brev”. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Malin skrev ett underbart brev” [pause].
Becky: Great! That wasn’t so difficult, but let’s do one more.
Elin: Sure, this time we’ll use the adjective “vacker” meaning “beautiful”, and we’ll let it refer to a neuter gender noun in its indefinite form. Let’s take the noun ”tal” meaning “speech”.
Becky: Okay, I know! How would you say, “Stina gave a beautiful speech “?
Elin: That’s, “Stina höll ett vackert tal”.
Becky: Listeners, repeat after Elin!
Elin: “Stina höll ett vackert tal” [pause].
Becky: Ok, now we also need to talk a bit about when adjectives are referring to nouns, either a common or neuter, that are in their indefinite plural form. What ending do they take?
Elin: They take the ending “a”, –a. In the dialogue, we have a sentence with an adjective that’s referring to a noun in its indefinite plural form.
Becky: That must be when “many beautiful buildings”?
Elin: That’s right! That was “många vackra byggnader”. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Många vackra byggnader” [pause].
Becky: Do we have any other examples?
Elin: Yes. Let’s try use the adjective “fin” meaning “nice” and have it refer to the noun “en sko” meaning “a shoe” in its indefinite plural form, “skor” meaning “shoes”.
Becky: How about “there were many nice shoes”? How would you say that?
Elin: That’s, “det fanns många fina skor”. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Det fanns många fina skor” [pause].
Becky: Great! How about another example?
Elin: Sure! Let’s use the adjective “underbar” meaning “wonderful”, and have it refer to the noun “ett brev” meaning “a letter” in its indefinite plural form, “brev” meaning “letters”.
Becky: What about the sentence, “Stefan wrote several wonderful letters to Camilla”? How would you say that?
Elin: That’s, ”Stefan skrev flera underbara brev till Camilla”.
Becky: Listeners, repeat after Elin!
Elin: ”Stefan skrev flera underbara brev till Camilla” [pause].
Becky: Ok listeners, remember to check the lesson notes to reinforce what you’ve learned.

Outro

Becky: Okay that’s it for this lesson. Thanks for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time.
Elin: Hej då!

6 Comments

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SwedishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Which Swedish city would you like to visit?

Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:47 pm
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Hej Ramona,


Mycket bra frågor! (Very good questions!)


"Till" is often used to show direction.

For example: Jag kör till affären. (I'm driving to the shop.)


We also use "till" when giving something to someone, just like the English "to".

For example: Jag köpte choklad till dig. (I bought chocolate for you.)


You are right, we use "den" with common nouns. However, the sentence example:

Det är en underbar stad. (It is a wonderful city.)

It uses "det" to refer to something, an 'it'. We could not say "Den" in this sentence, it would not be correct.


I understand this may seem contradicting, Swedish can be a little tricky sometimes! 😅


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com

Ramona
Tuesday at 6:52 pm
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Also, if stad is a common gender noun why is it 'det' and not 'den'?


Den är en underbar stad.


In the dialogue it is:

Det är en underbar stad.

"It's a wonderful city."


Thanks again!

Ramona
Tuesday at 6:34 pm
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Is there a rule on when to use 'till' and 'att' as a preposition? In both sentences the English preposition is 'to'.


Det fanns många fina skor att köpa.

"There were many nice shoes to buy."

Stefan skrev flera underbara brev till Camilla.

"Stefan wrote several wonderful letters to Camilla."


Thanks!

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Saturday at 7:36 pm
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Hej Joe Kaspar,


Tack för din kommentar. (Thank you for your comment.)

Det gör mig glad att höra att du tyckte om gamla stan. (It makes me happy to hear that you liked gamla stan.)

Stockholm är min hemstad. (Stockholm is my hometown.) :innocent:


Ha en trevlig dag! (Have a nice day!)

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Joe Kaspar
Friday at 3:56 am
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Jag tyckte om Goteborg men Gamla Stan I Stockholm är särskilt bra.