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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Morten: Hej och välkomna. Welcome to SwedishPod101.com Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 12 - Telling the Time in Swedish. Morten, here. And with me as usual is?
Jasmine: Jasmine. Hej, allihopa.
Morten: In this lesson, we will introduce time telling in Swedish.
Jasmine: The conversation takes place at the Gothenburg University cafeteria at lunch time.
Morten: James is talking to Ewa, his Polish flatmate.
Jasmine: The situation is fairly casual. However James and Ewa are taking care to use correct standard expressions to tell time. Let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Ewa: Nu är det klockan 12. Klockan 12.30 måste jag till föreläsningen.
James: Jag har en paus till klockan 14 och sedan en kurs till kl 15.30.
Ewa: Ikväll går jag på bio kl 20. Så, jag måste hem innan affären stänger i Kallebäck, kl 18.30.
James: Jaha, då måste du vara tillbaka i staden kl 19.45.
Ewa: Ja, och sedan tar jag sista bussen hem kl 23.15.
James: Lycka till med allt!
Morten: And now, let's hear the slow version.
Jasmine: Och nu ska vi lyssna på den sakta versionen.
Ewa: Nu är det klockan 12. Klockan 12.30 måste jag till föreläsningen.
James: Jag har en paus till klockan 14 och sedan en kurs till kl 15.30.
Ewa: Ikväll går jag på bio kl 20. Så, jag måste hem innan affären stänger i Kallebäck, kl 18.30.
James: Jaha, då måste du vara tillbaka i staden kl 19.45.
Ewa: Ja, och sedan tar jag sista bussen hem kl 23.15.
James: Lycka till med allt!
Morten: And now with the translation.
Jasmine: Och nu med översättningen.
Ewa: Nu är det klockan 12. Klockan 12.30 måste jag till föreläsningen.
Morten: It's 12 o'clock now. At 12.30 I need to go to the lecture.
James: Jag har en paus till klockan 14 och sedan en kurs till kl 15.30.
Morten: I have a break until 2 o'clock and then a course until 3.30.
Ewa: Ikväll går jag på bio kl 20. Så, jag måste hem innan affären stänger i Kallebäck, kl 18.30.
Morten: In the evening I am going to the cinema at 8. So, I must be home before the shops close in Kallebäck at 6.30.*
James: Jaha, då måste du vara tillbaka i staden kl 19.45.
Morten: All right, and then you have to be back in town at 7.45.
Ewa: Ja, och sedan tar jag sista bussen hem kl 23.15.
Morten: Yes, and then I take the last bus home at 11.15.
James: Lycka till med allt!
Morten: Good luck with everything!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Morten: On the subject of time, let's talk a bit about working hours in Sweden.
Jasmine: Yeah, it's an important topic. Most Swedes work 40 hours or less per week.
Morten: Oh, that's not an awful lot compared to other countries.
Jasmine: No. And Swedes also have quite a few holidays. Most people have between 25 and 30 days of annual leave.
Morten: Wow, not bad. And Sweden is still quite a wealthy, productive country.
Jasmine: Yes, it is. For most Swedes, private life is the most important focus.
Morten: And work is a tool to make life more comfortable. Very sensible.
Jasmine: The epitome of this attitude is a Swedish national institution, fika.
Morten: Ahh, the famous coffee break.
Jasmine: Exactly, a break with coffee and often a bite to eat.
Morten: Swedes often have two fika breaks a day, don't they?
Jasmine: Well, it's really hard to generalize here, but yes, a lot of Swedes do.
Morten: It looks like working hours, the holidays and fika are the main threads in the Swedish social fabric.
Jasmine: You could say that. Swedes don't like unnecessary stress.
Morten: I like that attitude. And they're still very successful commercially. And now, let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
First we have.
Jasmine: Då [natural native speed]
Morten: Then (here, "in that case").
Jasmine: Då [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Då [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Sedan [natural native speed]
Morten: Then, next.
Jasmine: Sedan [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Sedan [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Sist [natural native speed]
Morten: Last.
Jasmine: Sist [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Sist [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Klockan [natural native speed]
Morten: O'clock (lit. "the watch/clock")
Jasmine: Klockan [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Klockan [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Lycka till! [natural native speed]
Morten: Good luck!
Jasmine: Lycka till! [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Lycka till! [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: I dag [natural native speed]
Morten: Today.
Jasmine: I dag [slowly - broken down by syllable]. I dag [natural native speed]
Morten: And finally, we have.
Jasmine: Ikväll [natural native speed]
Morten: Tonight.
Jasmine: Ikväll [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Ikväll [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Morten: Let's now take a close look at the vocab and phrases in this lesson. First up in this lesson, the word and phrase for a clock.
Jasmine: And the word is klockan. As for the phrase, please repeat it after me, klockan två.
Morten: Klockan två. Well done. So does klockan always mean a clock?
Jasmine: No, the word also translates into the watch or the clock.
Morten: I see, klockan is the definite form of the word, but how can tell weather someone is talking about the time or about a clock.
Jasmine: You'll know from the context. I'm sure you will.
Morten: Thanks. Next up, we have the first word that translates into English as then.
Jasmine: Yes, it's då. Here it means, in that case.
Morten: Does it always have that meaning?
Jasmine: Not exactly. Perhaps, but it's a good estimation.
Morten: You can start almost any Swedish phrase with it, can't you?
Jasmine: Yes. It just means that one situation is the case and now something else follows from it.
Morten: And what about the other word for then?
Jasmine: sedan. This always means something like next.
Morten: Hey, you use two different pronunciations there, as you did in the vocab section, how is that?
Jasmine: Sedan is the formal word. It is usually used in writing informal situations.
Morten: And how about informal situations with friends and family?
Jasmine: For informal situations, Sen is used. This can be used anywhere in anytime, but if you want to be super polite, then use Sedan.
Morten: Okay, thanks. But whether formal or informal if you are listing stuff, you could say Sen, Sedan after each thing.
Jasmine: Absolutely, Jag tar bussen, sedan går jag, sedan är jag på jobbet.
Morten: I take the bus, then I walk, then I'm at work. Brilliant.
Jasmine: And now it's a good time to introduce our next word. It's sist and it means last.
Morten: Sist, but isn't it Sista in the dialogue?
Jasmine: Good eye there. It became Sista in the dialogue because Swedish adjectives change form according to number and definiteness.
Morten: Hang on. So when it modifies a definite noun, the adjective ends in -a and when it modifies a plural noun, the same things happens.
Jasmine: Exactly.
Morten: Okay, but last but not the least, the Swedish for good luck, a useful phrase by any standard.
Jasmine: Yes, it is. The phrase is lycka till! And it can be used on its own or with something else.
Morten: Lycka till med allt as it says in our dialogue.

Lesson focus

Now, let's take a look at the grammar section for this lesson. In our lesson focus, we're all about telling time in Swedish.
Jasmine: Yes and we'll offer lots of chances to the practice.
Morten: We'll also take a brief look at some pronunciation issues.
Jasmine: That's right.
Morten: Telling the time in Swedish isn't too hard, is it? How do you say two o'clock again?
Jasmine: klockan två. Please listen and repeat after me, klockan två.
Morten: Very good. How about 2.30?
Jasmine: Halv tre. Listen and repeat again, Halv tre.
Morten: Halv tre, okay. But didn't we say Fjorton och trettio before? Halv tre, has that the same meaning?
Jasmine: Yes, it does. In Swedish, there're two ways of saying half past. Like fjorton och trettio or Halv tre but it has the same meaning.
Morten: Wow, that's interesting. To express a half hour, you can say halv and then the next hour or alternatively you can say the hour and add trettio.
Jasmine: Yes, exactly opposite to the way English speakers say it, so watch out.
Morten: Yeah, please be on your guard here. By the way, does Sweden use the 24-hour system?
Jasmine: Well it varies. It is always used in writing, but sometimes when speaking about plans or starting and ending times, we also use it.
Morten: But you often just say halv två.
Jasmine: Correct and people will know from the context what you mean.
Morten: Okay. I suppose that's good enough for now. What about, say, 1.45?
Jasmine: You usually say kvart i två Listen and repeat, kvart i två.
Morten: And 2.15?
Jasmine: For 2.15, we usually say kvart över två Listen and repeat again, kvart över två.
Morten: And what would you say if it's a few minutes to or after the hour?
Jasmine: You just say the minutes, then i or över and then the hour.
Morten: So 1.50 is tio i två and 2.10 is tio över två.
Jasmine: Exactly, you say that out to the 20-minute mark.
Morten: So 20 till or 20 past, but hey, we haven't done 20 yet.
Jasmine: True, but from 20 past to 20 till, we use the half hour as our point of reference.
Morten: Oh. So for 2.25 you say fem i half tre.
Jasmine: Just det. Listen and repeat again fem i half tre.
Morten: Well done. And how about 2.35?
Jasmine: That's fem över half tre. Listen and repeat again, fem över half tre
Morten: Very good once again. Okay, let's recap a little. I'll give you the hour in English and you please say the time in Swedish. Let's start. Please say 3 o'clock.
Jasmine: Klockan tre. Now say 5 o'clock.
Morten: Klockan fem. Try, 3.30.
Jasmine: Halv fyra. and now 6.45.
Morten: Kvart i sju. Finally 9.15.
Jasmine: Kvart över nio. Very good, everybody.
Morten: That's a lot of grammar we just covered. Please do practice saying the time in Swedish as much as you can.
Jasmine: Yes, a very good idea indeed. Tack så mycket.
Morten: Just as a little addendum, let's take a look at the pronunciations of some peculiar vowel sounds.
Jasmine: Oh yes, a difficult but important pronunciations of Swedish U and Y.
Morten: For U, you round and protrude your lips, right?
Jasmine: Yes and for the Y, they're also rounded and protruded.
Morten: But for Y, you want to stretch the lips apart a bit and then protrude them upwards.
Jasmine: Yeah that way you almost have to produce the correct sound. Try it Y.
Morten: Y. Now, just make your lips round and stick them out for the U.
Jasmine: U. Lovely. Okay, that's it. Listeners, can you understand Swedish TV shows, movies or songs?
Morten: How about friends' or love ones' conversations in Swedish?
Jasmine: If you want to know what's going on, we have a tool to help.
Morten: Line-by-line audio.
Jasmine: Listen to the lesson conversations line by line and learn to understand natural Swedish fast.
Morten: It's simple really.
Jasmine: At the click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Morten: Listen again and again and tune your ear to natural Swedish.
Jasmine: Rapidly understand natural Swedish with this powerful tool.
Morten: Find this feature on the lesson page under premium member resources at SwedishPod101.com.
Jasmine: Tack så mycket.
Morten: Yes, thanks for listening. And hejdå, till next time.
Jasmine: Hejdå

47 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Welcome back! Are comfortable saying or understanding the time in Swedish?

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 9:35 pm
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Hej Gary,

There're always a few tricky aspects to learning languages. Good luck and let me know if you have any other questions! 👍


VickyT

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Gary
Tuesday at 9:28 pm
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Hej VickyT och Anders !


Thank you for your replies.


After lots of reading and your help, I now have a far better understanding of when and how to use reverse word order.


However, this still leaves the rather tricky issue of determining if the first word in the sentence is an adverb or a conjugator - which, I guess, has nothing to do with Swedish per se - so more reading required !


Hälsningar


Gary

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 7:42 pm
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Hej Anders,

You're most welcome! 😎


VickyT

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Anders
Wednesday at 11:33 pm
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Thanks Vicky 😁

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 8:07 pm
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Hej Anders,

You're very good at summarising and explaining grammar rules. Keep up the good work! 👍


VickyT

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 8:06 pm
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Hej Gary,

I see that Anders has already provided you with some excellent answers, and I won't repeat anything that's already been said.


I only wanted to add that "Så" is often used at the beginning of a sentence, this is done for several reasons. For example, when changing topics, or when adding something onto what someone else said, or as a way to start a topic or sentence when it has been quiet for a while. Basically, "så" can be used very much like the English "Well". It doesn't have much meaning per se, but it does add to the "feeling" of what is being said.


Here's one example:

-Vi får gäster imorgon. (We're having guests tomorrow.)

-Okej. Vem kommer? (Okay. Who's coming?)

-Mormor och morfar. Så, det vore bra om du städade ditt rum ikväll. (Grandmother and grandfather. So, it would be good if you cleaned your room tonight.)


I hope this doesn't cause any more confusion haha. 😜


VickyT

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Anders
Wednesday at 2:38 pm
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Hej Gary!


You're right, it is difficult. But there are some rules. Here goes.


1. In a main clause, if you put the subject first and then the verb (the verb always comes second), that's your straight word order: "Jag målar huset varje sommar" (I paint the house every summer). Put anything else before the verb and the order is reversed: "Huset målar jag varje sommar", "Varje sommar målar jag huset." So it's really a matter of where you choose to put the subject.


2. In a subordinate clause, the order is always straight: "När jag har tid", "Om du vill följa med" etc.


3. A main clause followed by a subordinate clause = straight word order in the main: "Jag måste sova eftersom jag är sjuk." Other way around = reversal: "Eftersom jag är sjuk måste jag sova."


In this particular example, "så" is not an adverb in a clause but a conjunction like "och" or "men". Så is not actually part of "Jag måste hem innan affären stänger", all it does is tie the two clauses together.


As for your second question, it is correct - that would be a question and then the verb comes first, just like in English. Så is just a discourse marker here.


Phew! Hope I got all that right and that it makes sense.

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Gary
Wednesday at 5:21 am
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Hej Anders !


Thank you for the explanation.


"But in this case you have two main clauses and så is just a conjunction."


Just to clarify the above, I assume that the first main clause you're referring to is:


"Ikväll går jag på bio kl 20." ?


Therefore, if this had not been in the text, "så" could not have been acting as a conjunction ? Hence, reverse word order would have occurred ?


How about instances where, "så" may be starting an arbitrary sentence, such as:


"Så, kan du snygga upp ditt sovrum i eftermiddag."


Is reverse word order correct here ?


Sorry for all of the questions, but reverse word order is, in my opinion, one of the most difficult parts of the Swedish language to master !


Hälsningar


Gary

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Anders
Wednesday at 12:08 am
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Thank you Gary.


That's a good question. Så can indeed trigger a reversal, as in "Så gör man" = That/this is how you do it, or "Om du diskar så torkar jag".

If you were to say, "Eftersom jag ska på bio så måste jag hem", the first part would be a subordinate clause after which the order is reversed. But in this case you have two main clauses and så is just a conjunction.

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Gary
Tuesday at 9:29 pm
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Hej Anders !


Thank you very much for your concise reply:


"It puts the emphasis on where you're going and it doesn't matter how you get there"


The above really helps !


Sorry, but I have another question relating to the text ?


"Så, jag måste hem innan affären stänger i Kallebäck, kl 18.30."


Please could you explain why placing the adverb, "Så" at the begiining of the above has not triggered a subject-verb reversal , but if the adverb, "Nu" was placed at the beginning, it would ?


"Nu, måste jag hem innan affären stänger i Kallebäck, kl 18.30."


Tack så mycket !


Hälsningar


Gary