Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Morten: Hej och välkomna tillbaka, this is Morten! Welcome to SwedishPod101.com Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 21 - Public Holidays in Sweden.
Jasmine: Hej, allihopa. I'm Jasmine.
Morten: In this lesson, we're looking at Swedish public holidays around the end on the year and expanding our numbers.
Jasmine: In our dialogue, we had a typical Lucia, St. Lucia party at Studenternas hus, organized by the IO.
Morten: James is talking to Anders in the early evening.
Jasmine: They're chatting casually using a lot of standard vocab.
Morten: Let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

James: Anders, hur är det med Luciadagen, är det alltid den 13e december?
Anders: Ja, just det. Liksom Julafton ligger alltid på den 24e.
James: Julafton... och vad kallas den 25e och 26e december för?
Anders: Juldagen och Annandag Jul. Hurså?
James: Jag ska resa hem till England under Jul. Men jag kommer tillbaka den 31a december.
Anders: Vad kul! Då kan vi ju fira nyårsafton tillsammans.
James: Ja, absolut. Den 1a januari är det också en helgdag i Sverige?
Anders: Javisst, nyårsdagen är alla lediga.
Morten One now the slow version.
Jasmine: Och nu den sakta versionen.
James: Anders, hur är det med Luciadagen, är det alltid den 13e december?
Anders: Ja, just det. Liksom Julafton ligger alltid på den 24e.
James: Julafton... och vad kallas den 25e och 26e december för?
Anders: Juldagen och Annandag Jul. Hurså?
James: Jag ska resa hem till England under Jul. Men jag kommer tillbaka den 31a december.
Anders: Vad kul! Då kan vi ju fira nyårsafton tillsammans.
James: Ja, absolut. Den 1a januari är det också en helgdag i Sverige?
Anders: Javisst, nyårsdagen är alla lediga.
English Host: And now with the English translation.
Anders: Och nu med den engelska översättningen.
James: Anders, hur är det med Luciadagen, är det alltid den 13e december?
Morten: Anders, what about Lucia Day, is it always on December 13?
Anders: Ja, just det. Liksom Julafton ligger alltid på den 24e.
Morten: Yes, that's right. Like Christmas Eve is always on the 24th.
James: Julafton... och vad kallas den 25e och 26e december för?
Morten: Christmas Eve...and what do you call the 25th and 26th of December?
Anders: Juldagen och Annandag Jul. Hurså?
Morten: Christmas day and Boxing day. Why?
James: Jag ska resa hem till England under Jul. Men jag kommer tillbaka den 31a december.
Morten: I am going home to England over Christmas. But I'll be back on December 31.
Anders: Vad kul! Då kan vi ju fira nyårsafton tillsammans.
Morten: How cool. So that means we can celebrate New Year's Eve together.
James: Ja, absolut. Den 1a januari, är det också en helgdag i Sverige?
Morten: Yes, absolutely. Is January 1st also a bank holiday in Sweden?
Anders: Javisst, nyårsdagen är alla lediga.
Morten: Yes, sure. On New Year's Day everyone is off.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Morten: So we are talking public holidays in Sweden today.
Jasmine: Yes, more specifically about those at the end of the year.
Morten: And what public holidays does Sweden have around that time?
Jasmine: Oh, quite a few. December 25th and 26th are public holidays and then there's January 1st and 6th.
Morten: Christmas and Boxing Day, New Year's day and…
Jasmine: Epiphany. But the most important festival around that time of the year is not a public holiday.
Morten: You are talking about Luciadagen.
Jasmine: Exactly. In Sweden, December 13th is St. Lucia's Day and it's a big event.
Morten: Pretty much all the schools in towns have their own Lucia procession don't they?
Jasmine: They do. And for a girl to be the local Lucia is the biggest thing ever.
Morten: So what happens on that day?
Jasmine: Very early in the morning, young people dress in white robes and the girl chosen to be Lucia with a crest of candles on her head hold the procession.
Morten: So lots of light and candles then? Is there anything to eat too?
Jasmine: Yes, lots of lussekatter, a special saffron Lucia bond and glögg.
Morten: That is Swedish mold wine. It sounds like Christmas time in Sweden is not to be missed.
Jasmine: Indeed. If you get the chance, do join in one or all of our many Christmas traditions.
VOCAB LIST
Morten: And now, let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. First, we have.
Jasmine: Alltid [natural native speed]
Morten: Always.
Jasmine: Alltid [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Alltid [natural native speed]
Male: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Luciadagen [natural native speed]
Morten: St. Lucy's Day.
Jasmine: Luciadagen [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Luciadagen [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Julafton [natural native speed]
Morten: Christmas Eve.
Jasmine: Julafton [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Julafton [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Juldagen [natural native speed]
Morten: Christmas Day.
Jasmine: Juldagen [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Juldagen [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Annandag Jul [natural native speed]
Morten: Boxing Day, we have.
Jasmine: Annandag Jul [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Annandag Jul [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Nyårsafton [natural native speed]
Morten: New Year's Eve.
Jasmine: Nyårsafton [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Nyårsafton [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Nyårsdagen [natural native speed]
Morten: New Year Day.
Jasmine: Nyårsdagen [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Nyårsdagen [natural native speed]
Morten: And next, we have.
Jasmine: Fira [natural native speed]
Morten: To celebrate.
Jasmine: Fira [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Fira [natural native speed]
Morten: And finally, we have.
Jasmine: Ledig [natural native speed]
Morten: Free, available, time off.
Jasmine: Ledig [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Ledig [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Morten: Let's now take a closer look at words and phrases from this lesson. This one actually isn't big on phrases, but we'll look at several vocab words up close.
Jasmine: First up is lovely word alltid
Morten: A useful word in many contexts. Is this the only way to say always in Swedish?
Jasmine: There are other ways but alltid is by the most common.
Morten: Can we have an example, please?
Jasmine: Lina har alltid mycket att göra.
Morten: Lina always has a lot to do. Let's listen again and repeat after Jasmine.
Jasmine: Lina har alltid mycket att göra.
Morten: Very nice. Can we get another example?
Jasmine: Lars kommer alltid för sent.
Morten: Lost is always too late. Let's listen and repeat again.
Jasmine: Lars kommer alltid för sent.
Morten: Good job, everyone.
Jasmine: Next is the word, ledig. In means free, but only certain kinds of free, so beware.
Morten: Yes. We use it when asking whether a chair is free…
Jasmine: …or to find out whether someone has time and is available to do something.
Morten: You can also use it to say you're off work.
Jasmine: But it is not used for things that come without cost.
Morten: For that, we need another word. But for now, let's hear a sentence with Ledig.
Jasmine: Är stolen ledig?
Morten: Is this chair taken.
Jasmine: That's right. So let's listen again and repeat, är stolen ledig?
Morten: Wonderful. Can we hear a sentence about free time, please?
Jasmine: På juldagen är många lediga i Sverige.
Morten: Many people get Christmas day off work in Sweden.
Jasmine: It's a bit longer, but try to repeat it after me, På juldagen är många lediga i Sverige.
Morten: Excellent job, everyone. Thank you.
Jasmine: Bra jobbat!
Morten: Thanks for the good work and staying with us thus far. Let's move on to the grammar section.

Lesson focus

Jasmine: In this lesson focus, we are looking at ordinal numbers in Swedish.
Morten: Ordinal numbers?
Jasmine: Yes, we've already covered the cardinal numbers up to 20.
Morten: Oh, you mean ett, två, tre, fyra...
Jasmine: And so on, yes, all the way up to tjugo, 20.
Morten: So, what's an ordinal number?
Jasmine: Ordinal numbers are numbers that give order of things like days with a month.
Morten: Ah, or order of people finishing in a race.
Jasmine: Exactly. In English, these ordinal numbers tend of end in a TH.
Morten: Like fourth, fifth, sixth, and so on?
Jasmine: Precisely. In Swedish, this is a little more complicated though.
Morten: In English, the numbers one to three are the most irregular. First, second, third, is the same true in Swedish?
Jasmine: Well while the ordinal numbers for one and two are pretty different from their cardinal counterparts, three is slightly more regular in Swedish. Let's first look at the regular ones up to 20, shall we?
Morten: Yes, sounds like a good idea.
Jasmine: We'll look first at 13 to 19 and then add 20.
Morten: Okay. What do we need to know about those numbers?
Jasmine: To get the ordinal version of any of those, just take the cardinal number and add DE.
Morten: Could you give us those in a list, please?
Jasmine: Certainly. Trettonde
Morten: Thirteenth.
Jasmine: Fjortonde
Morten: Fourteenth.
Jasmine: Femtonde
Morten: Fifteenth.
Jasmine: Sextonde
Morten: Sixteenth.
Jasmine: Sjuttonde
Morten: Seventeenth.
Jasmine: Artonde
Morten: Eighteenth.
Jasmine: Nittonde
Morten: Nineteenth. Well that's pretty straightforward. What about 20?
Jasmine: If you remember 20 in cardinal form is tjugon. The ordinal number adds DE at the as you'd expect. But it also slips an N between tjugo and DE.
Morten: So twentieth would be tjugonde.
Jasmine: Exactly. Now like most European language, Swedish basis its numbering system on the dozen.
Morten: Is that why the numbers up to twelve look so different from the teens?
Jasmine: Exactly. Before we look at all the numbers below thirteen, let's look at the most regular ones first.
Morten: Those would be seven, nine and ten. Just like 20, those numbers add NDE to go from cardinal to ordinal.
Jasmine: sjunde
Morten: Seventh.
Jasmine: nionde
Morten: Ninth.
Jasmine: And tionde
Morten: Tenth. Numbers five, eleven and twelve are fairly regular, but only fairly.
Jasmine: Yes, for phonological reasons these add not DE but TE.
Morten: And eleven even drops its final vowel, -a when it goes ordinal.
Jasmine: femte
Morten: Fifth.
Jasmine: elfte
Morten: Eleventh.
Jasmine: And tolfte
Morten: Twelfth. Actually you might have notice elva and tolv also changed from V to F.
Jasmine: True. That's also for phonological reasons. But in conversation, you can hardly hear the difference anyway.
Morten: Next, we'll look at eight. We will add ND to this one, nothing too crazy here, but the final vowel A changes to O when we make the ordinal number.
Jasmine: From åtta
Morten: Eight.
Jasmine: To åttonde
Morten: Eighth. Then there is three. Here the suffixes D, J, E rather than DE.
Jasmine: From Tre.
Morten: Three.
Jasmine: To tredje.
Morten: Third. And then we have four and six. The ordinals for these are formed quite differently, aren't they?
Jasmine: They are. Four goes from Fyra to fjärde making a Y sound almost as you would if this is for an English word.
Morten: And its vowel changes from E to Ä.
Jasmine: For six, something similar to four happens at the beginning of the word.
Morten: It goes from sex.
Jasmine: Six.
Morten: To sjätte.
Jasmine: Sixth.
Morten: This is very irregular, right?
Jasmine: Unfortunately, it is. And you need to be extra careful to not confuse sjätte and sextonde.
Morten: Why sjätte
Jasmine: Sixth.
Morten: And sextonde
Jasmine: Sixteenth.
Morten: They're quite different?
Jasmine: You think, but many mistakes are made here. And getting ordinal numbers wrong can get you really misunderstood.
Morten: That is true. And there is another pair where our listeners need to watch out.
Jasmine: Oh yes. Please don't confuse åttonde
Morten: Eighth.
Jasmine: And artonde
Morten: Eighteenth. To the untrained ear, the vowels in these can sound pretty similar. So let's practice this pairs a bit before finishing off with the ordinals for one and two.
Jasmine: Okay. Here is Sjätte and Sextonde. Please repeat after me Sjätte… Sextonde.
Morten: Well done, excellent. Next eight and eighteen please.
Jasmine: Åttonde, artonde.
Morten: Good job, everyone. At last we're ready for one and two.
Jasmine: Well the ordinal for one is actually a lot like the English word first.
Morten: It's Först, but as if to punish us for how easy that was, the ordinal for two is pretty different from the cardinal, isn't that right?
Jasmine: Yes. Second is andra.
Morten: That's about as irregular as it gets. Okay, let's hear all the ordinals up to 12 once more.
Jasmine: Please repeat after me, Första, andra, tredje, fjärde, femte, sjätte, sjunde, åttonde, nionde, tionde, elfte, tolfte.
Morten: Very good, everyone. And just to wrap it up nicely, a couple of examples please?
Jasmine: Thomas är alltid den första som kommer.
Morten: Thomas is always the first to arrive. Can we hear that one more time, please?
Jasmine: Thomas är alltid den första som kommer.
Morten: Thanks. And let's have one last sentence with an ordinal number.
Jasmine: Ska vi träffas den tolfte?
Morten: Shall we meet on the twelfth. Listen and repeat after me, please, Ska vi träffas den tolfte?
Jasmine: Listeners, do you know the reason flashcards are so popular?
Morten: It's because they work.
Jasmine: We've taken this time tested studying tool and modernized it with my word bank flashcards.
Morten: Learn vocabulary using your eyes and ears.
Jasmine: It's simple and powerful. Save difficult and interesting words to your personal vocabulary list called my word bank.
Morten: Master words in your my word bank by practicing with flashcards.
Jasmine: Words in my word bank come with audio, so you learn proper pronunciation…
Morten: …while you learn to recognize words by sight.
Jasmine: Go to SwedishPod101.com now and try my word bank and flashcards today. Tack så mycket. Till nästa gång!
Morten: Thanks a lot. Until next time. Hejdå
Jasmine: Hejdå

21 Comments

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SwedishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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What are the most important public holidays in your country?

Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:31 pm
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Hej Denis,


Tack, det är bra med mig! Hur är det med dig? (Thank you, I'm fine! How are you?)


Julafton stavas med liten bokstav, det gör alla svenska högtider - förutom när det är första ordet på en mening såklart. ("Julafton" is spelled with a small letter, as do all Swedish holidays - except when it's the first word in a sentence, of course. 😜


You would use "dagen", for example "Australiendagen" with a big A since it's a country (Australia Day). 😇


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Denis
Sunday at 11:14 am
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to add a question, should Julafton start with lower case j and when naming holidays outside Sweden should I use dag or dagen


Tack!

Denis
Sunday at 9:38 am
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Hej Vicky!


Hur står det till?


Vi har ANZAC Dag, 25 april, minns soldaterna som kämpade i krigar; Melbourne Cup Day (första tisdag i november) för en stor häst kapplöpning. Australien Dag när fängelsebåtar landade i arton århundrade.

Detta är föremål för politisk kontrovers. Också andra


tack, vi ses


Denis

Team Swedishpod101.com
Saturday at 1:07 am
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Hej George,

We say "Gustaf Adolf den andra" in Swedish. :innocent:


Ha det bra!

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

George
Friday at 12:01 am
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hej VickyT,


...så, hur säga man Gustav II Adolf i Sverige?


har det så bra

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Saturday at 5:39 pm
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Hej George,

Let us know if you have any other questions. :innocent:


Have a nice day!

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

George
Tuesday at 9:53 pm
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...ja, det hjälpte (?)


tack så mycket

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Monday at 11:59 pm
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Hej George,

Ja, det stämmer. (Yes, that's correct.)

1:a is short for "första"

2:a is short for "andra"

3:e is short for "tredje" and so on. We usually write the full word until twelve, and then we start using numbers. But when numbering things, you use the actual numbers.


I hope this helped!

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

George
Sunday at 10:52 am
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hej...


...do you really spell ordinal numbers like they did in the dialog above? And if so, is it with the " : " or rather without?


tack & har det så bra

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Saturday at 1:03 am
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Hej Adolf

We say "upptagen" or "ha fullt upp" when we speak about being busy. :innocent:

Vi är alltid upptagna kring Kinesiskt nyår.

Vi har alltid fullt upp kring Kinesiskt nyår.

(We're always busy around Chinese New year.)


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com