Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jasmine: Hej, och hallå, this is Jasmine.
Morten: Hej, allihopa and welcome back. This is SwedishPod101.com. Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 4 - Talking Nationalities in Swedish. As usual, we have an exciting lesson ahead of that.
Jasmine: True that.
Morten: In this lesson, we'll look at how to talk about countries and nationalities.
Jasmine: Since this is pretty irregular in Swedish, we picked a few to focus on.
Morten: You'll find more examples and helpful links in the lesson focus.
Jasmine: The conversation takes place at James and Ewa's flat at Ostkupan student halls in Gothenburg.
Morten: Ostkupan, that's the name of the student halls, right?
Jasmine: Yes, it means cheese dish cover.
Morten: Wow, I supposed that says something about Swedish food stuffs.
Jasmine: That's right, but that's not what we're here to talk about, is it?
Morten: In this lesson James and talking to Ewa.
Jasmine: They're getting to know each other, so they talk casually over coffee. Let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Ewa: Hej, jag heter Ewa och kommer från Polen. Vad heter du?
James: Mitt namn är James, jag är engelsman. Och du är polack.
Ewa: Ursäkta, men vad betyder det?
James: På svenska säger man polack till folk från Polen. Och till mig från England, engelsman.
Ewa: Jaså, det visste jag inte. Så, jag är polack. Och till folk från Sverige, vad säger man då?
James: De kallas för svenskor.
Ewa: Jaha, jag hoppas jag får träffa många av dem snart.
Morten: Let's hear it slowly now.
Jasmine: Nu ska vi lyssna på den sakta versionen.
Ewa: Hej, jag heter Ewa och kommer från Polen. Vad heter du?
James: Mitt namn är James, jag är engelsman. Och du är polack.
Ewa: Ursäkta, men vad betyder det?
James: På svenska säger man polack till folk från Polen. Och till mig från England, engelsman.
Ewa: Jaså, det visste jag inte. Så, jag är polack. Och till folk från Sverige, vad säger man då?
James: De kallas för svenskor.
Ewa: Jaha, jag hoppas jag får träffa många av dem snart.
Morten: And now with the translation.
Jasmine: Och nu översättningen.
Ewa: Hej, jag heter Ewa och kommer från Polen. Vad heter du?
Morten: Hi, I am Ewa and I'm from Poland. And you?
James: Mitt namn är James, jag är engelsman. Och du är polack.
Morten: My name is James and I am an Englishman. And you're a Pole.
Ewa: Ursäkta, men vad betyder det?
Morten: I'm sorry, but what does that mean?
James: På svenska säger man polack till folk från Polen. Och till mig från England, engelsman.
Morten: In Swedish you say "Pole" for someone from Poland. And for me, from England, "Englishman."
Ewa: Jaså, det visste jag inte. Så, jag är polack. Och till folk från Sverige, vad säger man då?
Morten: OK, I didn't know that. So I am a Pole. And what do you call people from Sweden?
James: De kallas för svenskor.
Morten: They're called Swedes.
Ewa: Jaha, jag hoppas jag får träffa många av dem snart.
Morten: All right, I hope I will meet a lot of them soon.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Morten: So, we're back at the flats. This time, it's James and his new Polish flatmate.
Jasmine: Ewa, yes. And what do you need to do when you are new somewhere?
Morten: Meet people, make friends?
Jasmine: And for that, you'll have to make a bit of an effort.
Morten: How come? I thought Swedes are always open and easy to talk to.
Jasmine: They are, largely.
Morten: Okay, but what you're saying is that getting to know someone takes more effort and initiative than a quick conversation at some chance meeting.
Jasmine: Exactly. Swedes are open and friendly, but they tend to have fairly tight at social networks.
Morten: More so than other people?
Jasmine: Well, that's hard to judge, but yes. Many Swedes are in the same class with the same people for nine years or more.
Morten: Wow, that's a long time. I guess they get to know each other pretty well.
Jasmine: Yes. On top of that, Sweden is a small country.
Morten: Come on, it's huge.
Jasmine: In land area, maybe, but it's a small society. Mobility is still somewhat restricted.
Morten: As in people from the countryside have a tendency to stay there?
Jasmine: Yeah. Of course, some people do move to the big cities to work or study.
Morten: But they retain close contact with their old school friends?
Jasmine: A lot of people do, yes.
Morten: But what does this mean for our listeners?
Jasmine: Just get out there, be proactive in meeting people and don't give up.
Morten: Especially not after only a short while.
Jasmine: Keep trying and things will fall into place for you.
Morten: Good luck making new Swedish friends. And now, let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
First we have.
Jasmine: Mitt namn (ett) [natural native speed]
Morten: My name.
Jasmine: Mitt namn (ett) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Mitt namn (ett) [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Säger (säga) [natural native speed]
Morten: To say (gerund form)
Jasmine: Säger (säga) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Säger (säga) [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Kalla för [natural native speed]
Morten: To call (something, not someone).
Jasmine: Kalla för [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Kalla för [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Polack [natural native speed]
Morten: Pole.
Jasmine: Polack [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Polack [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: An Engelsman [natural native speed]
Morten: Englishman.
Jasmine: An Engelsman [slowly - broken down by syllable]. An Engelsman [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Snart [natural native speed]
Morten: Soon.
Jasmine: Snart [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Snart [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: Vad betyder det? [natural native speed]
Morten: What does that mean?
Jasmine: Vad betyder det? [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Vad betyder det? [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: På svenska säger man... [natural native speed]
Morten: In Swedish you say...
Jasmine: På svenska säger man... [slowly - broken down by syllable]. På svenska säger man... [natural native speed]
Morten: And finally, we have.
Jasmine: Jag hoppas [natural native speed]
Morten: I hope.
Jasmine: Jag hoppas [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Jag hoppas [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Morten: We are looking at some more useful phrases in this lesson.
Jasmine: Yes. These phrases are very versatile in their potential use.
Morten: First up, we have the Swedish for, what does that mean?
Jasmine: Vad betyder det?
Morten: Please, listen again and repeat.
Jasmine: Vad betyder det?
Morten: When can you use this phrase?
Jasmine: Whenever there's something you don't understand.
Morten: A word, phrase or concept?
Jasmine: Yes. You can use this phrase freely.
Morten: Of course, you'll always sound like you're new.
Jasmine: Right, new to the place, new to the language, but it's absolutely okay to use when needed.
Morten: Next, we have another phrase that will help fish for words in Swedish.
Jasmine: You know what to call just about everything in your native language.
Morten: But how do you ask for its name in Swedish?
Jasmine: Vad säger man på svenska? what do you say in Swedish?
Morten: And you would then reply.
Jasmine: På svenska säger man...
Morten: So you can use this phrase to respond if you know the answer?
Jasmine: Or you can ask Vad säger man på svenska?
Morten: The great thing about this phrase is that you could use it and point to stuff, can't you?
Jasmine: Yes. There are other ways to ask for words in Swedish, but with this phrase you can point and ask.
Morten: Great. One more phrase to go.
Jasmine: When talking about yourself or saying Goodbye to others, you will often want to use a phrase like I hope.
Morten: And in Swedish that is?
Jasmine: Jag hoppas.
Morten: Give us some examples, please?
Jasmine: Okay. This one uses a word from the last lesson, Jag hoppas jag hittar.
Morten: I hope, I will find a way or perhaps Jag hoppas på bra väder.
Jasmine: Yes, I hope for a good weather or Jag hoppas du hittar.
Morten: I hope you will find the way. This is versatile indeed.
Jasmine: Absolutely. You can also use it on its own as a response.
Morten: Soon, you will all speak Swedish.
Jasmine: Jag hoppas.

Lesson focus

Morten: Now, let's move on to the grammar section. In this lesson focus, we're looking at two things.
Jasmine: Yes, to give your name in Swedish you say.
Morten: Jag heter Morten.
Jasmine: But I could also say Mitt namn är ...
Morten: My name is Morten. Which one should I use?
Jasmine: Jag heter is the best to use because it's the least marked or formal.
Morten: Mitt namn är Morten is more formal?
Jasmine: A little perhaps, but it's definitely okay to use.
Morten: How would you for someone's name?
Jasmine: Definitely using vad heter du?
Morten: I see. Anything else would sound way too formal right?
Jasmine: Precisely, but let's move on to our main focus.
Morten: Right on. In this lesson we are looking at countries and nationalities.
Jasmine: Unfortunately, this is not always straightforward in Swedish.
Morten: In the dialogue we had England, engelsman and Poland, polack.
Jasmine: England, Englishman and Poland, Pole.
Morten: Are these common ways to call countries and nationalities?
Jasmine: Yes and no. But let's have a few more examples, Frankrike, Fransman.
Morten: France, Frenchman. And how do you say, I am French.
Jasmine: Jag är en fransman.
Morten: Okay, let's practice this. Listen again and repeat.
Jasmine: Jag är en fransman.
Morten: Jag är en fransman, that's right. And I am American, Jag är amerikan. Please listen and repeat.
Jasmine: Jag är amerikan.
Morten: Jag är amerikan, well done. And how would you say, I am English?
Jasmine: Okay, that's a bit different. You would usually say jag är från England.
Morten: But you could also say, Jag är engelsman, right?
Jasmine: Yes, but it's a little less common.
Morten: So instead of saying Jag är en fransman, you could also say Jag är fransk.
Jasmine: Yes, that's correct, please repeat after me. Jag är fransk.
Morten: Jag är fransk. And what about Australia?
Jasmine: That's not an easy one. As for England, you'll probably say, Jag är från Australien.
Morten: I am from Australia. So you don't say I am an Australian.
Jasmine: Perhaps not. You could say Jag är australienare.
Morten: That is I'm an Australian, but you don't really hear that, do you? So how can our listeners find out what to call their country and nationality?
Jasmine: The lesson focus section of the PDF offers a comprehensive list.
Morten: So you can just look it up.
Jasmine: Or ask a Swede. You can't go wrong with that option.
Morten: Tyvärr, unfortunately, we couldn't cover all the nation and country names here.
Jasmine: But we hope you got the basic idea. Listeners, can you understand Swedish TV shows, movies or songs?
Morten: How about a friends' or love ones' conversations in Swedish?
Jasmine: If you want to know what's going on, we have a tool to help.
Morten: Line-by-line audio.
Jasmine: Listen to the lesson conversations line by line and learn to understand natural Swedish fast.
Morten: It's simple really.
Jasmine: At the click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Morten: Listen again and again and tune your ear to natural Swedish.
Jasmine: Rapidly understand natural Swedish with this powerful tool.
Morten: Find this feature on the lesson page under premium member resources at SwedishPod101.com. Okay, tack and bye-bye.
Jasmine: Hejdå, vi ses.

59 Comments

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Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Can you say your nationality in Swedish?

Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 10:41 am
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Hej Steffany,

Wow, Venezuela låter väldigt exotiskt! (Wow, Venezuela sounds very exotic!) 😮


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com

Steffany
Friday at 4:11 am
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Ja! Jag är venezuelansk! 😊🇻🇪


Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 11:15 pm
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Hej Eunice,

Vad häftigt! Jag skulle vilja åka till Brasilien. (Cool! I would like to go to Brazil.) :innocent:


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Eunice
Friday at 4:53 am
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Jag är braziliansk. Jag kommer från Brasilien.

Team Swedishpod101.com
Saturday at 1:09 am
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Hej Kay,

Jag har varit i Thailand, det är vackert. (I've been to Thailand, it's beautiful.) :innocent:


Ha det bra!

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Kay
Sunday at 12:03 pm
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Jag är Thai.

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 11:41 pm
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Hej Leslie,

"Jag är colombian." (I'm a Colombian.) "Jag är från Colombia." (I'm from Colombia.) We don't have a Swedish word for this, we use the same word as in English but with a Swedish pronunciation. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Leslie Solorzano
Sunday at 9:08 am
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Hej!


Vad sager man pa svenka "I am colombian" och "I am from Colombia"?

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 10:58 am
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Hi Marc,


When we say "Lesson Focus" we mean the "Grammar" section that is inside the Lesson Notes.

We apologize if that was not clear.

Anyway if you find something which is not covered in the Lesson notes, feel free to ask questions through the comments! We'll be glad to help.


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team SwedishPod101.com

Marc
Tuesday at 5:43 pm
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I'm frustrated with the pdf notes. I hear mentioned the Lesson Focus; but the pulldown for downloads shows transcript and Notes. I have been using the Notes and finding some phrases spoken in the lesson are not the ones in the notes - so that I cannot see what is being said.


Is there another file or notes called "Focus"?

Have the voice lessons been updated ahead of the notes?

Just trying to understand the best way to study and not miss anything I could use.

Tack