Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Morten: Hej, allihopa. Morten here! And with me is as usual.
Jasmine: Jasmine. Hej och välkomna.
Morten: And welcome to SwedishPod101.com Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 8 - Balancing Work Life and Family Life in Sweden. In this lesson, we are looking at the family and some professions.
Jasmine: Yes. So the focus is on vocab largely.
Morten: This is a conversation over a cup of coffee at Ostkupan the student residence where we've been before. Our main character James is talking to Ewa, his Polish flatmate.
Jasmine: James keeps talking to Ewa very casually about their respective families and what they do for a living.
Morten: The conversation has very little formality.
Jasmine: However, the terminology they use, two non-native speakers as they are, is more standard and not as intimate as it might be if Swedes were involved.
Morten: Yes, but we'll take a glimpse of that other terminology in our lesson focus as well.
Jasmine: Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Ewa: Förresten James, vad gör dina föräldrar?
James: Alltså, min mor är ingenjör och min far är lärare, engelska och tyska. Och dina föräldrar, vad gör de?
Ewa: Min far är advokat och min mor jobbar som läkare på sjukhuset i Poznan.
James: Min bror, han jobbar på en bank och min syster ska bli psykolog. Hon studerar just nu.
Ewa: Jaha, alltså min lillebror går fortfarande i skolan.
Morten: Let's now listen to the slow version.
Jasmine: Nu ska vi lyssna på den sakta versionen.
Ewa: Förresten James, vad gör dina föräldrar?
James: Alltså, min mor är ingenjör och min far är lärare, engelska och tyska. Och dina föräldrar, vad gör de?
Ewa: Min far är advokat och min mor jobbar som läkare på sjukhuset i Poznan.
James: Min bror, han jobbar på en bank och min syster ska bli psykolog. Hon studerar just nu.
Ewa: Jaha, alltså min lillebror går fortfarande i skolan.
Morten: Let's now listen to the English translation.
Jasmine: Nu ska vi lyssna på den engelska översättningen.
Ewa: Förresten James, vad gör dina föräldrar?
Morten: By the way, James, what do your parents do?
James: Alltså, min mor är ingenjör och min far är lärare, engelska och tyska. Och dina föräldrar, vad gör de?
Morten: Well, my mother is an engineer and my father is a teacher, English and German. And your parents, what do they do?
Ewa: Min far är advokat och min mor jobbar som läkare på sjukhuset i Poznan.
Morten: My father is a lawyer, and my mother works as a doctor at the hospital in Poznan.
James: Min bror, han jobbar på en bank och min syster ska bli psykolog. Hon studerar just nu.
Morten: My brother is working at a bank, and my sister is going to be a psychologist. She is studying right now.
Ewa: Jaha, alltså min lillebror går fortfarande i skolan.
Morten: OK, well, my little brother is still in school.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Morten: James's mother is an engineer and his father, a teacher. Will that be common in Sweden?
Jasmine: Well James isn't Swedish, but yes, that wouldn't be uncommon in Sweden at all.
Morten: Swedes take gender equality seriously, don't they?
Jasmine: Yes, most do. For instance, our parliament has been 45% female for years.
Morten: Wow, that's a lot compared to most other countries. How about other spheres of society?
Jasmine: The public sector is like the parliament. The private sector isn't as equal.
Morten: But there are still more high ranking women in Sweden than in elsewhere.
Jasmine: That's right. Many Swedes, male and female, consider themselves feminists.
Morten: I see. Has that sentiment led to any legislation?
Jasmine: Yes, for example, Sweden has banned prostitution, but only the client is prosecuted.
Morten: Well, that is rather feminist. What about families and birth rates?
Jasmine: Sweden has a declining birth rate, but nowhere near as dramatic as Japan's or Germany's.
Morten: Does that have anything to do with how much family leaves Swedes are allowed to take from work?
Jasmine: Yes, parents in Sweden can take a combined 480 days of paid leave to spend with their kids as they're growing up.
Morten: Is it mostly women who take this leave?
Jasmine: Well women take out the larger share, but 60 days each are tied to the individual. Each of the partners had to take 60 days otherwise they are forfeited.
Morten: So if the man for instance doesn't use the 60 days, they're gone.
Jasmine: Exactly. So many men do use them. Some take off even longer stretches of time.
Morten: It seems that family is very important people in Sweden.
Jasmine: It is. You will also see many proud fathers strolling around Swedish town centers with their offspring.
Morten: And is all that true for the entire populace?
Jasmine: Well there will be differences of course. But generally male Swedes of local or immigrant backgrounds take out their parental leave.
Morten: That's fascinating. But let's now move on to the vocabulary section.
VOCAB LIST
First we have.
Jasmine: Föräldrar [natural native speed]
Morten: Parents.
Jasmine: Föräldrar [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Föräldrar [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: En advokat [natural native speed]
Morten: A lawyer.
Jasmine: En advokat [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En advokat [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: En lärare [natural native speed]
Morten: A teacher.
Jasmine: En lärare [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En lärare [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: En ingenjör [natural native speed]
Morten: An engineer.
Jasmine: En ingenjör [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En ingenjör [natural native speed]
Morten: And next, we have.
Jasmine: Jobba [natural native speed]
Morten: To work.
Jasmine: Jobba [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Jobba [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: En syster [natural native speed]
Morten: A sister.
Jasmine: En syster [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En syster [natural native speed]
Morten: And next, we have.
Jasmine: En bror [natural native speed]
Morten: A brother.
Jasmine: En bror [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En bror [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: En far [natural native speed]
Morten: A father.
Jasmine: En far [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En far [natural native speed]
Morten: Next, we have.
Jasmine: En mor [natural native speed]
Morten: A mother.
Jasmine: En mor [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En mor [natural native speed]
Morten: And finally, we have.
Jasmine: En läkare [natural native speed]
Morten: A medical doctor.
Jasmine: En läkare [slowly - broken down by syllable]. En läkare [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Morten: Let's now take a closer look at the words and phrases in this lesson. We have no real phrases in this lesson.
Jasmine: But there is a lot of vocab to take a look at.
Morten: The word jobba for instance, is that used for any kind of job?
Jasmine: Yes, for any kind, a full time career, a part time job or any form of paid labor.
Morten: Is there any other word for job?
Jasmine: Yes, arbeta. It means exactly the same, but it's older and more traditional.
Morten: Otherwise no different. Understood.
Jasmine: As we said, phrases are an important part of this lesson.
Morten: But we will be looking into a lot of this lesson's vocab in the lesson focus.
Jasmine: Let's get to it.

Lesson focus

Morten: Let's now take a look at the grammar section. In this lesson focus, we'll take a close look at some vocabulary words.
Jasmine: And at the possessive pronouns.
Morten: Possessive pronouns.
Jasmine: Yes, as in min mor and dina föräldrar.
Morten: My mother and your parents, got it. In the dialogue, we saw the possessive forms of only I and you.
Jasmine: Yes. Those are the ones our listeners are most likely to use.
Morten: All right. But I'm wondering something. Compare min mor and dina föräldrar, where does the extra A come from?
Jasmine: You noticed that, huh? In Swedish, the possessive pronoun for I, singular, you and we vary with the thing being possessed.
Morten: You mean, it matters whether the thing I have like parents or mother is singular or plural.
Jasmine: Correct. That doesn't change the pronoun in English, but it does in Swedish.
Morten: Yikes, watch out for that.
Jasmine: As in English, singular and plural you are exactly the same.
Morten: Good, nothing to worry about there.
Jasmine: While we're talking about possessive pronouns, we should give the ones for he, she, it, we and they as well.
Morten: Sure. hans, his, hennes, hers.
Jasmine: There is no special possessive pronoun for it.
Morten: vår, our and deras, their.
Jasmine: Apart from vår, our, all these possessives stayed the same whether the noun they modify is singular or plural.
Morten: That was a handful, I dare say.
Jasmine: Was it? Well, the possessive that's the most important to know are min, din, mina and dina.
Morten: Oh good. And the rest you can always review in the PDF for this lesson.
Jasmine: So no need to worry.
Morten: Let's leave possessives for now and review the words for family members. Mother was?
Jasmine: Mor, that's right. And father was?
Morten: Far, good. And what about brother and sister?
Jasmine: Bror and syster, excellent.
Morten: Is that the way Swedes would also speak about their parents?
Jasmine: Well the word we introduced are the official standard once.
Morten: They are perfectly usable, but?
Jasmine: But there is another more casual way.
Morten: I guess that means you'd need to know a person pretty well to use these words.
Jasmine: That's right. When you're starting out, it's best to use the vocab from the dialogue.
Morten: Probably yeah, but we still want you to be aware of these casual forms.
Jasmine: Exactly. As a matter of fact, two of them actually came up in the lesson focus of lesson six.
Morten: I think I remember. The casual word to say my mother was?
Jasmine: morsan, literally the mother. And the casual word for my father would be?
Morten: farsan and the terms for my brother and my sister are?
Jasmine: brorsan and syrran
Morten: Thanks a lot for all those words and thanks a lot for joining us in this lesson, listeners.
Jasmine: Listeners, do you know the powerful secret behind rapid progress?
Morten: Using the entire system.
Jasmine: Lesson notes are an important part of this system.
Morten: They include the transcript and translation of the conversation.
Jasmine: Key lesson vocabulary…
Morten: …and detailed grammar explanations.
Jasmine: Lesson notes accompany every audio or video lesson.
Morten: Use them on the site or mobile device or print them out.
Jasmine: Using the lesson notes with audio and video media will rapidly increase your learning speed.
Morten: Go to SwedishPod101.com and download the lesson notes for this lesson, right now. Until next time. Tack så mycket, Jasmine. Hejdå.
Jasmine: Tack själv. Hejdå.

40 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

SwedishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hello listeners! What do your parents do? Answer it in Swedish!

SwedishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 11:21 PM
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Hej Jan,

Thank you for bringing that to our attention! It is common to have certain words pronounced very faintly during actual dialogues in Sweden, certain words even being skipped, but we see what you mean. Thanks for the feedback, it's very helpful! 😇


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com

Jan
Thursday at 10:26 PM
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For "alltså min lillebror går fortfarande i skolan."


very hard to hear the "går".


And for "Hon studerar just nu", the "nu" seems missing in the pronunciation, or?


Tack.

SwedishPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 07:55 AM
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Hej Usman,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team SwedishPod101.com

Usman
Saturday at 10:39 PM
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Thanks a lot Vicky 👍 :) I'll definitely keep an eye out for this.

SwedishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:29 PM
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Hej Usman,

Yes, it is quite common for Swedes to speak in this way, I'm afraid. 😄 I can understand if it feels a little overwhelming at first. When speaking to other Swedish people, Swedes often speak quickly and some words might get mixed into each other.


Your example is a very good one. When a "d" is after an "r", and Swedes are speaking quickly, it is not unusual for them to barely pronounce the "d". For example, "Hur mår du?" (How are you?) can sometimes sound more like "Hur mår-u?" 😁 It is good to be aware of. However, as a non-native, don't be afraid to ask the Swede you are talking with to slow down!


Hope that answers your question! Let us know if there is anything else you are wondering about.


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com

Usman
Wednesday at 04:34 AM
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my comment regarding speed isn't just part of this lesson, but other lessons as well and also Swedish I have heard following audio from a book. more often, speaker speeds through almost mumbling the words into a mix. For instance, in above "vad gör dem" the "dem" sounds like "rum".

Thanks much.

Usman
Wednesday at 04:30 AM
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Hi,

is this normal way of speaking Swedish, speeding through? It mostly seems the speaker is in a race to speak the sentence as fast as possible. Is this realistic and how Swedes speak?

Tack!

Best Regards,

SwedishPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:16 PM
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Hej Ružica,

Vad fint du skriver på svenska! Bra jobbat. Ja, "min" och "mitt" betyder samma sak, men det finns en skillnad. Vi använder "min" när substantivet är utrum, och "mitt" när substantivet är neutrum. Till exempel säger vi "en katt" och "min katt", eftersom katt är utrum. Vi säger "ett äpple" och "mitt äpple", eftersom äpple är neutrum. Hoppas det svarade din fråga! 😁


(How nicely you write in Swedish! Well done. Yes, "min" and "mitt" mean the same thing, but there is a difference. We use "min" when the noun is common gender, and "mitt" when the noun is neuter gender. For example, we say "en katt" and "min katt", as the noun for "cat" is common gender. We say "ett äpple" and "mitt äpple", as the noun for "apple" is neuter gender. Hope that answered your question! 😁)


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com

Ružica
Wednesday at 02:27 PM
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Hej, allihopa! Hur är det?

Mina föräldrar är ingenjörar, och min lillebror ska bli pianist. Han studerar just nu.


Jag är ledsen, men jag har en fråga - what is the difference between the pronoun "min" and the pronoun "mitt". Tack så mycket!

SwedishPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:13 PM
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Hej Ibrahim,

Jättebra skrivet! 😁 Bra jobbat.

(Very well written! 😁 Well done.)


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com