Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Alisha:Hi Everyone! This is Alisha:and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1, Lesson 19 - Bargaining in Swedish.
Satsuki:Hej allihopa! I’m Satsuki.
Alisha:In this lesson you’ll learn how to bargain at a flea market. Hmm, I love flea markets so I can see how this skill might be useful!
Satsuki:That’s right! The conversation takes place at a flea market.
Alisha:And it’s between Lisa and a flea market vendor, and they’ll be using informal Swedish, since it’s quite an informal setting.
Satsuki:Let’s listen to the conversation!

Lesson conversation

Lisa Åh vilken fin väska! Hur mycket?
Loppmarknadsförsäljare 200 kronor.
Lisa Va! 200 kronor. Det är för dyrt. Jag kan betala 100 kronor.
Loppmarknadsförsäljare Den ser ny ut även om den är begagnad. Du får den för 150 kronor.
Lisa Den ser inte ny ut. Den ser gammal ut. Jag kan betala 125 kronor.
Loppmarknadsförsäljare Okej. 125 kronor.
Lisa Tack!
Alisha: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Lisa Åh vilken fin väska! Hur mycket?
Loppmarknadsförsäljare 200 kronor.
Lisa Va! 200 kronor. Det är för dyrt. Jag kan betala 100 kronor.
Loppmarknadsförsäljare Den ser ny ut även om den är begagnad. Du får den för 150 kronor.
Lisa Den ser inte ny ut. Den ser gammal ut. Jag kan betala 125 kronor.
Loppmarknadsförsäljare Okej. 125 kronor.
Lisa Tack!
Alisha: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Lisa Åh vilken fin väska! Hur mycket?
Alisha:Oh, what a nice bag. How much?
Loppmarknadsförsäljare 200 kronor.
Alisha:200 crowns.
Lisa Va! 200 kronor. Det är för dyrt. Jag kan betala 100 kronor.
Alisha:What! 200 crowns? It’s too expensive. I can pay 100 crowns.
Loppmarknadsförsäljare Den ser ny ut även om den är begagnad. Du får den för 150 kronor.
Alisha:It looks new, even though it’s second-hand. You’ll get it for 150 crowns.
Lisa Den ser inte ny ut. Den ser gammal ut. Jag kan betala 125 kronor.
Alisha:It doesn’t look new. It looks old. I can pay 125 crowns.
Loppmarknadsförsäljare Okej. 125 kronor.
Alisha:Okay. 125 crowns.
Lisa Tack!
Alisha:Thanks!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Alisha:It’s great that Lisa managed to get a lower price on the bag!
Satsuki:Yes, it’s good to be able to bargain when you visit a flea market!
Alisha:So is it okay to bargain at any other places?
Satsuki:Hmm, not really, the flea market is almost the only place where it’s okay to bargain in Sweden.
Alisha:I see. And are flea markets popular in Sweden?
Satsuki:Yes, flea markets and secondhand shops are quite common and very popular in Sweden.
Alisha:And where do you find them?
Satsuki:Well, there are different kinds of flea markets. The most common ones are places where people can rent a table, then sell things they don’t want anymore.
Alisha:And another kind is the “trunk” flea market, where you sell things from out of the trunk of your car, right?
Satsuki:That’s right. Those two kinds are fun, but my favorite is the secondhand shops like the Salvation Army, that sells things that have been donated. It’s cheap, and you can find really nice things there!
Alisha:Make sure you check them out, listeners! Okay, now it’s time for the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Alisha:Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Satsuki:fin [natural native speed]
Alisha:nice, good
Satsuki:fin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:fin [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:väska [natural native speed]
Alisha:bag
Satsuki:väska [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:väska [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:den ser [adjective] ut [natural native speed]
Alisha:it looks [adjective]
Satsuki:den ser [adjective] ut [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:den ser [adjective] ut [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:även [natural native speed]
Alisha:even
Satsuki:även [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:även [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:om [natural native speed]
Alisha:if
Satsuki:om [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:om [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:begagnade [natural native speed]
Alisha:second hand
Satsuki:begagnade [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:begagnade [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:att få [natural native speed]
Alisha:to get
Satsuki:att få [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:att få [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:gammal [natural native speed]
Alisha:old
Satsuki:gammal [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:gammal [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:loppmarkand [natural native speed]
Alisha:flea market
Satsuki:loppmarkand [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:loppmarkand [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:ny [natural native speed]
Alisha:new
Satsuki:ny [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:ny [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Alisha:Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Satsuki:We will start with the noun ‘loppmarknad’.
Alisha:That means “flea market”.
Satsuki:Yes, but there is also an abbreviation of ‘loppmarknad’ that Swedes tend to use - it is ‘loppis’.
Alisha:I see, good to keep in mind. What other words should we talk about?
Satsuki:Next, we have the verb ‘att få’.
Alisha:That was used when the flea market vendor told Lisa that she’ll get the bag for 150 crowns.
Satsuki:Yes, in this lesson’s dialog, ‘att få’ translates to the verb “to get”. But it's a difficult verb, because it can mean other things, and it’s used in many different ways.
Alisha:Yes, apart from “to get”, it can also be used when we want to say things like “to be allowed”, “to cause” or even “to succeed”. So you can see how that might create some confusion.
Satsuki:Yes, but for now, let’s only use it like in this lesson’s dialog.
Alisha:And now it’s time for the grammar!

Lesson focus

Alisha:In this lesson, you’ll learn how to bargain at a flea market.
Satsuki:Okay, to learn how to bargain, we need to look more closely at some of the sentences that Lisa uses in the dialog.
Alisha:Yes. There are two sentences, and both of them are used to state something about the appearance of an object. When Lisa comments on the appearance of the bag that she wants to buy, she says “it looks old”.
Satsuki:That was ‘den ser gammal ut’. There’s also another sentence where Lisa says, “it doesn’t look new”. She says, ‘den ser inte ny ut’.
Alisha:So, the structures of these two sentences are almost identical, but the difference is that one of them is a negative statement.
Satsuki:Yes, ‘den ser inte ny ut’, meaning “it doesn’t look new” is a negative statement, because it includes the word ‘inte’, meaning “not”. But let’s start with the regular statement ‘den ser gammal ut’, which means “it looks old”.
Alisha:Listeners, repeat after Satsuki.
Satsuki:‘Den ser gammal ut.’ [pause]
Alisha:Now, we can use the structure of this sentence to form other similar sentences. Just change the adjective used, and you’ll be able to say something about the appearance of an object.
Satsuki:That’s right!
Alisha:And this will be essential if we want to bargain! Okay, let’s try to use the same sentence but with a different adjective! How do we say, “it looks worn”?
Satsuki:Well, you start with the “it looks” part, which is ‘den ser’ or ‘det ser’.
Alisha:Why are there two alternatives here?
Satsuki:Well, it depends on whether the object is a common or neuter gender noun. You use either ‘den ser’ for a common gender noun, or ‘det ser’ for a neuter gender noun.
Alisah I see!
Satsuki:But for simplicity’s sake, let’s pretend that we are talking about ‘en väska’ – “a bag” – which is a common gender noun, and use ‘den ser’ in the rest of this lesson.
Alisha:Sounds good to me! Okay, so how do we say, “it looks worn”?
Satsuki:We’ll start with the ‘den ser’ part, which is then followed by the adjective that we want to use, in this case “worn”, which in Swedish is ‘sliten’. Finally, we have to add the preposition ‘ut’, which is used in Swedish, but not in English. So it’s ‘Den ser sliten ut’.
Alisha:That wasn’t so difficult! Now, let’s try one with a negative statement as well.
Satsuki:Okay! It’s very simple – you use the same structure, but you need to add the word ‘inte’ meaning “not” after the verb ‘ser’, which means “looks”.
Alisha:Okay, so how would I say, “it doesn’t look clean”?
Satsuki:As usual, we start with ‘den ser’ meaning “it looks”, followed by ‘inte’. Then we need the adjective “clean” which in Swedish is ‘ren’, followed by the preposition ‘ut’. Altogether, it’s ‘Den ser inte ren ut’.
Alisha:Great! And is there anything else we need to learn so we can bargain?
Satsuki:Yes, there are two more sentences that are good to master. The first is sentences like “it’s too expensive”, which would be ‘Den är för dyr’. Listeners, repeat after me.
Satsuki:‘Den är för dyr’. [pause]
Alisha:That wasn't too bad!
Satsuki:No, and you can use this sentence pattern and just replace the adjective ‘dyr’, with any other adjective that will help you bargain.
Alisha:What are some examples of adjectives?
Satsuki:You could use adjectives such as ‘sliten’ (“worn”), ‘smutsig’ (“dirty”) or ‘rostig’ (“rusty”) for example.
Alisha:Okay, and what’s the second sentence we need to learn?
Satsuki:That’s saying how much we’re willing to pay, for example, “I can pay 125 crowns”, which was ‘Jag kan betala 125 kronor’. Listeners, repeat after me. ‘Jag kan betala 125 kronor’. [pause]
Alisha:So I guess you could change the “125 crowns” part into whatever amount you are willing to pay, right?
Satsuki:Yes, that’s right.
Alisha:Great! I think that will do it for this lesson, but be sure to check the lesson notes, and we’ll see you next time.
Satsuki:Great work everyone! Hej då!
Alisha:Bye!

7 Comments

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SwedishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 6:30 pm
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Where is your favorite Swedish market?

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 4:22 pm
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Hej Olga!


Thank you for your comment! Tack!


It's Loppmarknad !


Good luck!

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

Olga
Thursday at 10:19 pm
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loppmarkand or loppmarknad???

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 3:17 pm
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Hej Gary!


Great work writing about your trip to Stockholm and it was easy to understand everything you written.


If there is one pointer that I would like to give, is to be careful with how you use the verb "att tycka" in Swedish. The English counterpart "to think" is a bit more versatile while the Swedish "att tycka" cannot be used in the same way. If you want to express that thought something as in believed that something would be in a certain way, then you'll use the verb "att tro". So instead of writing "Vi tyckte som vår favorit skulle vara Abbamuseet, men vi gillade Vasamuseet" mer." you would write "Vi trodde vår favorit skulle vara Abbamuseet, men vi gillade Vasamuseet mer."


It sure sounds like you had a nice experience in Stockholm. I think your timing was perfect, because the weather isn't that nice now. I've also wanted to visit Vasamuseet for a while, so I think I'll have to go now, when I've heard so much positive things about it.


Keep up the good work!


Cheers,

Satsuki Team SwedishPod101.com

Gary
Saturday at 4:09 am
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Hej Satsuki !


Tack så mycket for din kommentarer och snäll ord !


Objektet som jag förhandlade för på svenska på loppmarknaden var för en uppsättning av rysk dockor.

Min fru har vilja en uppsättning av rysk dockor för en lång tid, så vi var tvungen köpa dem !


Förresten, tyckte vi som Stockholm var en väldigt vacker (men dyr!) stad.


Vi hade en utmärkt tid och besökte många museer - vårt favorit ett var definitivt Vasamuseet. Vi tyckte som vår favorit skulle vara Abbamuseet, men vi gillade Vasamuseet mer. Men de var allt bra.


Åh, och vädret var väldigt varm !!!


Som alltid, hälsningar


Gary

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Friday at 5:41 pm
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Hej Gary!


I'm so great to hear from you! I was wondering if you had been to Stockholm yet since you said previously that you where going in September.


It's even greater that you managed to use this lesson to bargain at a Swedish "loppis"! Maybe you would like to tell me a bit about the object you bought in Swedish?


As always, it's very easy to understand when you write in Swedish. Excellent work! There are only some minor errors that I would like to make you aware of.

One thing that I would suggest is that you use the verb "att komma" in its supine "kommit" together with the noun "hem" (home) instead of the verb "returnerat". In Swedish "retunerat is probably something we would more commonly use when we talk about sending back an object. Another very minor thing is that names of capitals such as Stockholm are written with a initial capital letter. Also "lång helg" is written together "långhelg". In Swedish we like to combine to words into one rather then writing them separately as you tend to do in English. In fact, when Swedes themselves frequently make the mistake of writing to words separately (as I myself often do) it is referred to as "engelska sjukan". With that being said, the sentence "Jag har just returnerat från en lång helg i stockholm" would be changed to "Jag har just kommit hem från en långhelg i Stockholm."

In Swedish it's okay to start sentencence with "och" so I would therefore make the "och medan jag var där gick jag till en loppmarknad" into its own sentence.

For your last sentence there are only two small things. The first thing is that you need to use the preposition "i" to "på" when you want to say that you bargained in Swedish. Swedish prepositions are tricky since they sometimes correspond to how they are used in English and sometimes does not as in this case. Also instead of using the verb "att ta" (to take) to say that you got 5 crowns taken from the price I would suggest you use "avdraget". So the sentence "På loppmarknaden, förhandlade jag med loppmarknad försäljare i svenska och fick fem kronor tagit från priset!" would become "På loppmarknaden, förhandlade jag med loppmarknad försäljare på svenska och fick fem kronor avdraget från priset!"


I know that all of the suggestion might seem a lot, but please know that you have a very natural flow to your Swedish and the sentence structures and the tense used are excellent! You should be proud!


Please keep up the great work it's wonderful to see you progress.


Cheers,

Satsuki Team SwedishPod101.com

Gary
Monday at 7:47 pm
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Hej igen !


Jag har just returnerat från en lång helg i stockholm och medan jag var där, gick jag till en loppmarknad. På loppmarknaden, förhandlade jag med loppmarknad försäljare i svenska och fick fem kronor tagit från priset !


(I've just returned from a long weekend in Stockholm and while I was there I went to a flea market. At the flea market, I bargained with the flea market vendors in Swedish and five krowns taken from the price.)


Jag kunde inte ha gjorde detta innan den här läxa - tack så mycket !


Hälsningar


Gary