Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Alisha:
Hi Everyone! This is Alisha:and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Beginner season 1, lesson 21 - What’s Christmas Like in Sweden?
Satsuki:
Hej allihopa! I’m Satsuki. In this lesson, you’ll learn to talk about the things people generally do with the help of the pronoun ‘man’.
Alisha:
The conversation takes place at Lisa’s apartment, and it’s between Lisa and her friend Anna. They will be using informal Swedish since they know each other.
Satsuki:
Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Lisa Anna, hur firar svenskarna jul?
Anna I Sverige, firar man jul tillsammans med våran familj den tjugofjärde i tolfte.
Lisa Jaha. Men vad gör man?
Anna Man äter julmat, man ger varandra presenter och man tittar på Kalle Anka.
Lisa Jaså? Inget annat?
Anna Vissa människor går till kyrkan, men inte alla.
Lisa Jaså.
Alisha:
Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Lisa Anna, hur firar svenskarna jul?
Anna I Sverige, firar man jul tillsammans med våran familj den tjugofjärde i tolfte.
Lisa Jaha. Men vad gör man?
Anna Man äter julmat, man ger varandra presenter och man tittar på Kalle Anka.
Lisa Jaså? Inget annat?
Anna Vissa människor går till kyrkan, men inte alla.
Lisa Jaså.
Alisha:
Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Lisa Anna, hur firar svenskarna jul?
Alisha:
Anna, how do Swedes celebrate Christmas?
Anna I Sverige, firar man jul tillsammans med våran familj den tjugofjärde i tolfte.
Alisha:
In Sweden, we celebrate Christmas together with our families on the 24th of December.
Lisa Jaha. Men vad gör man?
Alisha:
I see. But what do you do?
Anna Man äter julmat, man ger varandra presenter och man tittar på Kalle Anka.
Alisha:
You eat Christmas food, you give each other presents and you watch Donald Duck.
Lisa Jaså? Inget annat?
Alisha:
Really? Nothing else?
Anna Vissa människor går till kyrkan, men inte alla.
Alisha:
Some people go to church, but not everyone.
Lisa Jaså.
Alisha:
I see.
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Alisha:
Christmas seems like a big holiday in Sweden!
Satsuki:
Yes, and a lot of Swedes do celebrate Christmas.
Alisha:
I’m curious about something - what was Anna referring to when she mentioned watching Donald Duck?
Satsuki:
Oh, good question. Every year on Christmas Eve in Sweden, a special Christmas-themed cartoon featuring Donald Duck is aired on TV.
Alisha:
Do a lot of people watch it?
Satsuki:
Yes, you would be surprised! Some figures say that around 40-50% of the population tune in every year.
Alisha:
Wow! So it’s really become a Swedish Christmas tradition!
Satsuki:
Yes, it started airing in 1959, so it’s been around for many years. I don’t think it’s going anywhere soon!
Alisha:
All right, and with that, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Alisha:
Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Satsuki:
att fira [natural native speed]
Alisha:
to celebrate
Satsuki:
att fira [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
att fira [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
våran [natural native speed]
Alisha:
our
Satsuki:
våran [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
våran [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
familj [natural native speed]
Alisha:
family
Satsuki:
familj [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
familj [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
tjugofjärde i tolfte [natural native speed]
Alisha:
December 24th
Satsuki:
tjugofjärde i tolfte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
tjugofjärde i tolfte [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
julmat [natural native speed]
Alisha:
Christmas food
Satsuki:
julmat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
julmat [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
att ge [natural native speed]
Alisha:
to give
Satsuki:
att ge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
att ge [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
varandra [natural native speed]
Alisha:
each other
Satsuki:
varandra [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
varandra [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
att titta [natural native speed]
Alisha:
to watch
Satsuki:
att titta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
att titta [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
vissa [natural native speed]
Alisha:
some
Satsuki:
vissa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
vissa [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:
alla [natural native speed]
Alisha:
everybody
Satsuki:
alla [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:
alla [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Alisha:
Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Satsuki:
We’ll start with the pronoun ‘våran’.
Alisha:
That means “our”. But be careful – this pronoun can sometimes be difficult for non-native speakers to use, because its ending changes depending on whether the noun it’s referring to is a neuter gender noun, or a common gender noun. Can you explain this a bit more, Satsuki?
Satsuki:
Of course! If it’s referring to a common gender noun, like ‘familj’ meaning “family”, you say ‘våran’.
Alisha:
Okay, and if it’s referring to a neuter gender noun?
Satsuki:
In that case, you say ‘vårt’.
Alisha:
Could you give us an example?
Satsuki:
Sure! Take the neuter gender noun ‘kalas’, which means “party”. In that case, you would say ‘vårt kalas’, which is “our party”.
Alisha:
What’s next?
Satsuki:
We also need to talk a bit about the verb ‘att ge’, which was in the dialog.
Alisha:
Remind me, what did that mean?
Satsuki:
‘att ge’ means “to give”, but it can also be used in other ways.
Alisha:
You can use it when you’re talking about distributing cards at a card game, or when talking about people who’ve given up on dream, or a certain behavior. Hmm, this seems like quite a difficult verb to use!
Satsuki:
I understand that it might seem a bit confusing, but the way ‘att ge’ is used in the dialog, to mean “to give”, is probably the most common.
Alisha:
Well, that’s good news! Now it’s time for the grammar.

Lesson focus

Satsuki:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about things that people generally do, with the help of the pronoun ‘man’.
Alisha:
Remind our listeners what this pronoun means.
Satsuki:
Okay, ‘man’ usually corresponds to the English “you” or “we”, when speaking in general terms. And it’s an indefinite pronoun.
Alisha:
That means it’s a pronoun that refers to one or more unspecified objects, places or beings. That’s the reason we use it when we want to talk about things that people generally do, right?
Satsuki:
Exactly! The pronoun ‘man’ is used when we talk about things in general, when you are not referring to a specific person, or when you are talking about conditions that concern everybody.
Alisha:
Okay, I think I understand. Can you give us some examples?
Satsuki:
Sure, let’s look at one of the sentences from the dialog.
Alisha:
It’s when Anna says, “In Sweden, we celebrate Christmas together with our families..."
Satsuki:
Yes, which was, ‘I Sverige, firar man jul tillsammans med våran familj…’.
Alisha:
Let’s have our listeners practice this. Repeat after Satsuki.
Satsuki:
‘I Sverige, [pause] firar man jul tillsammans med våran familj…’. [pause]
Alisha:
So in this sentence the pronoun ‘man’ means “we”.
Satsuki:
Yes.
Alisha:
But you said that it also can be used like “you” in English.
Satsuki:
That’s right! And we have another sentence from the dialog that’s an example of that.
Alisha:
I’m guessing it’s the sentence, “You eat Christmas food, you give each other presents and you watch Donald Duck."
Satsuki:
Yes, exactly! It was ‘Man äter julmat, man ger varandra presenter och man tittar på Kalle Anka’.
Alisha:
That’s a really long sentence, so lets get our listeners to practice that one! Repeat after Satsuki, everyone.
Satsuki:
‘Man äter julmat, [pause] man ger varandra presenter [pause] och man tittar på Kalle Anka’. [pause]
Alisha:
Great! Is that all for this lesson?
Satsuki:
There’s actually one more thing!
Alisha:
Okay, what’s that?
Satsuki:
Well, I said before that the pronoun ‘man’ usually corresponds to “we” or “you”.
Alisha:
Yes.
Satsuki:
It can also be used to mean “one” or “they”.
Alisha:
Do you have any examples?
Satsuki:
Sure. One example of a sentence where ‘man’ means “one” is... “One learns as long as one lives."
Alisha:
And how would you say that in Swedish?
Satsuki:
‘Man lär så länge man lever’.
Alisha:
Okay, let practice that sentence!
Satsuki:
Listeners, repeat after me!
Satsuki:
‘Man lär så länge man lever’.
Alisha:
What about a sentence where it means “they”?
Satsuki:
Okay. “In the US, they celebrate Christmas on the twenty-fifth of December" would be ‘I USA friar man jul den tjugofemte december’.
Alisha:
Okay, just to be safe, let’s practice that one as well! Repeat after Satsuki, listeners.
Satsuki:
‘I USA friar man jul den tjugofemte december’. [pause]
Alisha:
Ok, that’s going to do it for this lesson! Make sure you check the lesson notes, and we’ll see you next time.
Satsuki:
Great work everyone! Hej då.
Alisha:
Bye!

5 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Thursday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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What Sweidish holiday do you like?

SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 3:58 pm
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Hejsan Yolande!


Haha, jag förstår vad du menar! Vi är många i min släkt också.


Jättebra jobbat med svenskan! Bara några jättesmå missar.


"Jag gillar min familj, men det är för många folk,

och efter två dagar jag âr trött och uppskattar min ensamhet"


Jag gillar min familj, men de är för många,

och efter två dagar är jag trött och uppskattar min ensamhet.


Vi ses! :)

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

Yolande Brunelle
Monday at 4:54 am
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Hej,

Jag föredrar mellandagarna när jag är ensam.

Jag gillar min familj, men det är för många folk,

och efter två dagar jag âr trött och uppskattar min ensamhet.


Ha det bra,

Yolande

SwedishPod101.com
Friday at 5:52 pm
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Hej Gary!


Thank you for your question.


I must say that I'm finding this word a bit tricky to explain, but I'll do my best :smile:


"Viss" is an adjective that can be used in different ways. It is often translated to the English "certain" but can also correspond to "some" as in this lesson's dialog.


We often use it to talk about specific people or objects without naming them. In Swedish you would for example say, "En viss person åt upp alla kakor" (A certain person ate all the cookies). Here we know who ate the cookies but we are not saying who.


We can also use this adjective when referring to a certain amount of volume or weight, without specify the actual amount. You can for example say, "För att göra äppelpaj behöver man en viss mängd äpplen" (To make apple pie you need a certain amount of apples".


A third reason for using "viss" is when we either don't know or if we don't want to specify something. "Det finns vissa skäl till varför jag inte kan ta jobbet" (There are certain reasons for why I cannot accept the job)


"Viss" can also be used when we are talking about abstract things such as knowledge or feelings. "Jag har viss kunskap om datorer" (I have certain/some knowledge about computers).


I hope this has provided you with at better idea of how to use "viss" and as you probably have figured out, "viss" can be used to refer to both countable and uncountable things.


I would also like to thank you for your feedback about the lesson notes being incorrect. We have fixed it already.

Cheers,

Satsuki Team SwedishPod101.com

Gary
Thursday at 6:22 pm
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Hej Satsuki !


Quick question regarding the usage of the swedish word, "vissa" meaning some. Are there any specific 'rules' that govern the use of vissa as apposed to lite when talking about some ?


Lite was used in lesson 16, an example being, "Kan du köpa lite mjölk?", to refer to something that's uncountabe, So is vissa used to mean some when the some is countable ?


Btw, the "VOCABULARY PHRASE USAGE" section within the lesson notes of lesson 16 are incorrrect and appear to be for lesson 5.


Hälsningar


Gary