Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Alisha:Hi Everyone! This is Alisha, and welcome to SwedishPod101.com. This is Beginner season 1, lesson 7, What’s Wrong With your Swedish Food?
Satsuki:Hi everyone, or ‘hej allihopa’ as you’d say in Swedish! I’m Satsuki
Alisha:Satsuki, could you tell us what this lesson will be about?
Satsuki:Of course! In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make a complaint.
Alisha:The conversation takes place at a restaurant, and it’s between Lisa and a waiter.
Satsuki:They’ll be using formal Swedish, since they don’t know each other.
Alisha:Great! Let’s listen to the conversation!

Lesson conversation

Servitör Hur smakar din kycklingsallad?
Lisa Inte så bra.
Servitör Jaså.Vad är det för fel?
Lisa Kycklingen är för torr och dressingen är för salt.
Servitör Vill du ha något annat?
Lisa En tonfisksallad, tack.
Servitör Självklart!
Alisha: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Servitör Hur smakar din kycklingsallad?
Lisa Inte så bra.
Servitör Jaså.Vad är det för fel?
Lisa Kycklingen är för torr och dressingen är för salt.
Servitör Vill du ha något annat?
Lisa En tonfisksallad, tack.
Servitör Självklart!
Alisha: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Servitör Hur smakar din kycklingsallad?
Alisha:How is your chicken salad?
Lisa Inte så bra.
Alisha:Not that good.
Servitör Jaså.Vad är det för fel?
Alisha:Really. What’s wrong?
Lisa Kycklingen är för torr och dressingen är för salt.
Alisha:The chicken is too dry and the dressing is too salty.
Servitör Vill du ha något annat?
Alisha:Would you like anything else?
Lisa En tonfisksallad, tack.
Alisha:A tuna salad, please.
Servitör Självklart!
Alisha:Of course!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Alisha:I'm glad that we’re learning how to make a complaint in this lesson, but tell me Satsuki:– is this a really useful skill to master when you eat out in Sweden? Is the food really that bad?
Satsuki:Alisha, that’s a good question. But no, I’d say that the food quality in general is quite good. Of course, it varies from restaurant to restaurant, but generally there’s no reason to worry.
Alisha:Oh that’s good to hear, and would you say that it’s quite safe too?
Satsuki:Yes. And in Sweden, there are actually a lot of regulations, that safeguard the quality of food served in restaurants.
Alisha:Oh really, what kinds of regulations?
Satsuki:Well, local governments make sure that the restaurants in their area store and prepare food properly. And if they don’t, they could be shut down.
Alisha:Great, I definitely feel reassured, and I think our listeners will be happy to visit Sweden’s restaurants now!
Satsuki:Yes, they should! There’s a diverse range of restaurants and flavors, at least in the bigger cities, that are well worth trying!
Alisha:That sounds wonderful, but now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Alisha:Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Satsuki:att smaka [natural native speed]
Alisha:to taste
Satsuki:att smaka [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:att smaka [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:bra [natural native speed]
Alisha:good
Satsuki:bra [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:bra [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:fel [natural native speed]
Alisha:wrong
Satsuki:fel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:fel [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:för [natural native speed]
Alisha:too
Satsuki:för [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:för [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:torr [natural native speed]
Alisha:dry
Satsuki:torr [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:torr [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:dressing [natural native speed]
Alisha:dressing
Satsuki:dressing [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:dressing [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:salt [natural native speed]
Alisha:salty
Satsuki:salt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:salt [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:något annat [natural native speed]
Alisha:anything else
Satsuki:något annat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:något annat [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:tack [natural native speed]
Alisha:please
Satsuki:tack [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:tack [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:jaså [natural native speed]
Alisha:really
Satsuki:jaså [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:jaså [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Alisha:Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Satsuki:Let’s start with the word ‘tack’!
Alisha:That means “thanks”, right?
Satsuki:Yes ‘tack’ does translate to “thanks”, but in the dialogue it actually has another meaning.
Alisha:Really, what’s that?
Satsuki:It’s used the same way that an English speaker would use the word “please”.
Alisha:Oh I see, you mean when Lisa says, “a tuna salad, please”?
Satsuki:Yes exactly, she says ‘en tonfisksallad , tack’.
Alisha:Okay. I think I understand...so if you want to say, “one coffee, please” in Swedish, you would say...
Satsuki:En kaffe, tack.
Alisha:And how would you say “a cheese and ham sandwich, please”?
Satsuki:En ost och skinksmörgås, tack!
Alisha:Okay, that wasn’t so difficult. I think I know how to use it now!
Satsuki:Great, now let’s look at the next word, which is ‘jaså’. Do you remember what this means, Alisha?
Alisha:Isn’t it like the English expression “really”?
Satsuki:It is! And it’s a good word to use when you discover, or are told, something you didn't expect.
Alisha:So, is it also like the expressions “oh” and “I see”?
Satsuki:Yes, absolutely!
Alisha:OK! Now, let’s move on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Alisha:In this lesson, you will learn how to make a complaint, like Lisa does in this lesson’s dialog, when she says "the chicken is too dry, and the dressing is too salty".
Satsuki:That’s right. She says ‘Kycklingen är för torr och dressingen är för salt’. A key word here is ‘för’.
Alisha:What does that mean?
Satsuki:The word ‘för’ means “too”, and it’s a key word for the kinds of sentences we’ll learn how to form in this lesson.
Alisha:Hmm, I’m a bit confused.
Satsuki:Really? Why?
Alisha:Well, I thought this word meant something completely different!
Satsuki:Oh! I understand what you mean, and actually, I’m glad you brought it up. Let me explain.
Alisha:Please do!
Satsuki:Well, the word ‘för’ can be a bit tricky for non-native speakers because it’s used a lot in Swedish, but not so much as an adverb, like it was in this lesson’s dialog.
Alisha:So how is it usually used, then?
Satsuki:It’s also used as a preposition, and in that case, it’s like “at” or “to”.
Alisha:Okay, I see.
Satsuki:But let’s leave that for another time, and only focus on the adverb ‘för’, which means “too”.
Alisha:OK!
Satsuki:So, in the dialog, the word ‘för’ means “too”, and you can use it when you want to complain and say that something is, for example, “too salty”. You just put the ‘för’ in front of an adjective.
Alisha:I see, just like in English.
Satsuki:Exactly!
Alisha:So, how would you say that “the bread is too hard” in Swedish?
Satsuki:You would say ‘brödet är för hårt’.
Alisha:Okay let’s let the listeners practice now!
Satsuki:Great idea! Okay listeners, repeat after me. “The bread is too hard”, ‘Brödet är för hårt’. [pause]
Alisha:Now, let’s try to complain about something else. How could I say “the food is too cold”?
Satsuki:That’s ‘maten är för kall’. Listeners, let’s practice this too! Repeat after me. “The food is too cold”, ‘maten är för kall’. [pause]
Alisha:I think that’s a really good one to know. How do I say “the meat is too tough”?
Satsuki:That’s ‘köttet är för segt’.
Alisha:Let’s get our listeners to practice this one too.
Satsuki:Listeners, repeat after me! “The meat is too tough”, ‘köttet är för segt’.[pause]
Alisha:Well, that’s all for this lesson, but I hope you come back soon to learn more Swedish here at SwedishPod101.com!
Satsuki:Yes, great work everyone! See you next time! ‘Hej då!’
Alisha:Bye!

27 Comments

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SwedishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Have you ever tried Swedish food? What do you like? :)

Team SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 5:05 pm
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Hej Ramona,

Har du provat någon annan svensk mat? (Have you tried any other Swedish food?) 😇


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Ramona
Friday at 6:36 pm
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Jag gillar räkor smörgåsar. Jag blev förvånad.

Team SwedishPod101.com
Thursday at 5:26 pm
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Hej Janet,


I'm sorry, could you explain what you mean? In what part of the lesson are you missing the Swedish?


Thank you!


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Janet
Saturday at 6:05 am
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There is no Swedish shown in this lesson, What is Wrong with Your Swedish Food.

Team SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 1:28 am
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Hej Alvaro,

Thank you for your comment. We put an "s" at the end of a weekday when we speak of a past day. For example: I lördags åt jag på McDonalds. (Last Saturday I ate at McDonalds.) However, we only put an "s" at the end of weekdays, not months or weeks.


If you would like to say "Last month" you would say "Förra månaden", and "last week" becomes förra veckan. I hope this helps.


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Alvaro
Thursday at 6:11 am
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Why is it"lördags"? with an S at the end.

Team SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 7:43 pm
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Hej Christian,

Vad kul att höra att du fortsätter använda svenska recept hemma, även fast du kanske ändrar dom lite haha. Har du provat pyttipanna? (It's fun to hear that you're continuing to use Swedish recipes at home, even if you may be modifying them a little haha. Have you tried pyttipanna?)


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Christian Barrette
Monday at 11:37 am
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Hej allihopa.

Jag faktiskt gillar många svenska rätter. När jag resde i Sverige, brukade äta på restaurang för lunch och laga middag hemma, eftersom priserna var för höga i restaurangerna på kvällerna. Bland annat, då är jag tillbacka hemma, jag fortsätter att baka mina egna kanelbuller och att laga min gravadlax. För jag är kanadensare, användar jag lönnsocker in mina recept, som är ganska roligt.

Team Swedishpod101.com
Saturday at 3:23 pm
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Hej Gouda,

Det låter som en dålig restaurang. Kyckling är vanligtvis gott! (That sounds like a bad restaurant. Chicken is usually tasty!) :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Guoda Tian
Wednesday at 6:54 am
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Lisa gillar inte maten på restaurang, eftersom kyclingen är torr och dressingen är salt. Hon ska beställa tonfisksalladen.