Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Alisha:Hi everyone, this is Alisha, and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com! This is Beginner season 1, lesson 9 - Going to a Swedish Job Interview.
Satsuki:Hej allihopa! I’m Satsuki.
Alisha:In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe your previous job experience. This is a useful skill for job interviews!
Satsuki:Exactly! The conversation takes place at the office of a restaurant manager.
Alisha:Lisa is having a job interview with the restaurant manager.
Satsuki:And they’re using formal Swedish, since they do not know each other.
Alisha:Great! Let’s listen to the conversation!

Lesson conversation

Chefen Lisa, har du jobbat som servitris tidigare?
Lisa Ja, jag har arbetat som servitris tidigare.
Chefen Bra. Varför ska jag anställa dig?
Lisa Jag är punktlig och effektiv.
Chefen Utmärkt! Jag ringer dig. Det var trevligt att träffas.
Lisa Trevligt att träffas.
Alisha: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Chefen Lisa, har du jobbat som servitris tidigare?
Lisa Ja, jag har arbetat som servitris tidigare.
Chefen Bra. Varför ska jag anställa dig?
Lisa Jag är punktlig och effektiv.
Chefen Utmärkt! Jag ringer dig. Det var trevligt att träffas.
Lisa Trevligt att träffas.
Alisha: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Chefen Lisa, har du jobbat som servitris tidigare?
Alisha:Lisa, have you worked as a waitress before?
Lisa Ja, jag har arbetat som servitris tidigare.
Alisha:Yes, I have worked as a waitress before.
Chefen Bra. Varför ska jag anställa dig?
Alisha:Great! Why should I hire you?
Lisa Jag är punktlig och effektiv.
Alisha:I am punctual and effective.
Chefen Utmärkt! Jag ringer dig. Det var trevligt att träffas.
Alisha:Splendid! I will call you. It was nice to meet you.
Lisa Trevligt att träffas.
Alisha:Nice to meet you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Alisha:It looks like Lisa’s interview went pretty well! I hate going to job interviews... I always get so nervous!
Satsuki:Yes, it can be quite nerve-racking, so it is always good to be prepared.
Alisha:So, how would you prepare for a job interview in Sweden?
Satsuki:Well you are usually asked to describe your strengths, like Lisa was in the dialog.
Alisha:Anything else?
Satsuki:Yes, sometimes you will also be asked about your weaknesses.
Alisha:Ah yes, I dread that question.
Satsuki:I suppose everyone has weaknesses, and Swedish employers usually think it’s better to at least be aware of them.
Alisha:Well that’s a good point. But Satsuki, an interview is usually quite a formal event, so why does this dialog seem so relaxed?
Satsuki:Well, as you probably know by now, Swedes are quite casual in general. So, even if interviews are formal situations, and it’s always good to be on you best behavior, you should remember to relax, or you might seem a bit uptight.
Alisha:Okay, I will remember that, but let’s now move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Alisha:Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Satsuki:att ha [natural native speed]
Alisha:to have
Satsuki:att ha [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:att ha [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:som [natural native speed]
Alisha:as
Satsuki:som [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:som [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:servitris [natural native speed]
Alisha:watiress
Satsuki:servitris [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:servitris [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:tidigare [natural native speed]
Alisha:before
Satsuki:tidigare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:tidigare [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:att anställa [natural native speed]
Alisha:to hire
Satsuki:att anställa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:att anställa [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:punktlig [natural native speed]
Alisha:punctual
Satsuki:punktlig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:punktlig [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:effektiv [natural native speed]
Alisha:effective
Satsuki:effektiv [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:effektiv [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:utmärkt [natural native speed]
Alisha:splendid
Satsuki:utmärkt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:utmärkt [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:att ringa [natural native speed]
Alisha:to call
Satsuki:att ringa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:att ringa [natural native speed]
Next:
Satsuki:trevligt att träffas [natural native speed]
Alisha:nice to meet you
Satsuki:trevligt att träffas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Satsuki:trevligt att träffas [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Alisha:Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Satsuki:We’ll start with the word ‘utmärkt’.
Alisha:That means “splendid”, right?
Satsuki:Yes, and it’s a really good expression to use when you want to highlight that you think something is really good.
Alisha:So I guess you can also use this word the same way as other expressions like “cool!” and “that’s great!”?
Satsuki:Yes, that’s right. Now, the next thing that we’ll talk more about is the phrase ‘trevligt att träffas’.
Alisha:That’s the formal way of saying “nice to meet you”, right?
Satsuki:Yes, but Swedes also tend to use it in casual settings.
Alisha:Like when you’re introduced to a friend of a friend?
Satsuki:Yes, that might be a situation where you would use this phrase, but you could also go for the more casual version, ‘kul att träffas’, which also means “nice to meet you”.
Alisha:Ok! And with that, let’s move on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Alisha:In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe previous job experiences. And we will start by looking at one of the sentences from the dialog.
Satsuki:It’s the one where Lisa says “yes, I have worked as waitress before”, which is ‘ja, jag har arbetat som servitris tidigare’.
Alisha:Haven’t we looked at similar sentences before?
Satsuki:Yes we have, well spotted! We have looked at forming sentences in the present tense, by using the auxiliary verb ‘har’ and a verb in its supine form. But we didn’t look at the rules for conjugating verbs into their supine form.
Alisha:Oh, so I guess that’s what we’re looking at more closely today?
Satsuki:Yes, but we will only look at the verbs that conjugate regularly, and not at the irregular or strong verbs, as they are also known.
Alisha:Okay that sounds good, let’s start!
Satsuki:As you might remember, there are three different groups of verbs that conjugate regularly.
Alisha:The first group are the verbs whose stem ends in an ‘–a’, right?
Satsuki:You’re absolutely right! Do you remember any of the verbs that belong to this group?
Alisha:Yes, the verbs “taste”, and “pay”!
Satsuki:Yes “taste” in Swedish is ‘smaka’ and “pay” is ‘betala’.
Alisha:So what ending do they take in their supine form?
Satsuki:They take the ending ‘–t’. So ‘smaka’ changes to ‘smakat’ and ‘betala’ changes to ‘betalat’.
Alisha:Let’s let our listeners practice this!
Satsuki:Okay listeners, repeat after me! ‘smaka’, ‘smakat’, ‘betala’, ‘betalat’ [pause between each]
Alisha:Okay, so what about the next group? That’s the group with verbs whose stem ends in a consonant, right?
Satsuki:Yes, and this group take the ending ‘–t’, but there are two situations we need to spend some time talking about.
Alisha:Okay, tell me!
Satsuki:First, you have verbs with stems that end in a ‘–d’ or a ‘–t’. In those cases, the ‘–d’ or the ‘–t’ is removed before the verb takes the ending ‘–t’ in its supine form.
Alisha:Do you have examples?
Satsuki:Let’s us the verb ‘använd’, which means “use”. that changes to ‘andvänt’ in its supine form.
Alisha:And another example?
Satsuki:Yes, we also have the verb ‘lyft’ that means “lift”, which changes to ‘lyft’ in its supine form.
Alisha:I see. Let’s practice these two verbs as well.
Satsuki. Yes! Listeners, please repeat after me! ‘använd’, ‘använt’, ‘lyft’, ‘lyft’. [pause between each]
Satsuki:Then, we also have the verbs with a long vowel that end in a ‘–d’.
Alisha:And how do they change to their supine form?
Satsuki:You drop the final ‘–d’, and you add double ‘t’.
Alisha:Doesn't the Swedish verb “bleed” belong to this group?
Satsuki:Yes, the verb “bleed”, which is ‘blöd’ changes to ‘blött’. Listeners, please repeat after me! ‘Blöd’, ‘blöt’.
Alisha:Ok, and how about the last group of weak verbs?
Satsuki:The third and final group of verbs are the ones with a stem that ends in a vowel other than ‘–a’.
Alisha:And what ending do they take?
Satsuki:They also end in double ‘t’. So for example, the Swedish verb for “live”, ‘bo’, changes to ‘bott’ in its supine form.
Alisha:That wasn’t so difficult, but let’s practice the last one anyway!
Satsuki:Listeners, please repeat after me! ‘Bo’, ‘bott’.
Alisha:Great! That’s it for this lesson! Make sure to check the lesson notes, and thanks for listening, everyone!
Satsuki:Yes and please come back soon to SwedishPod101.com!
Alisha:Bye everyone!
Satsuki:Hej då! See you next time!

5 Comments

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SwedishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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What is a job interview like in your country? Would you say it's about the same?

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 5:07 pm
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Hej Scotty!


Thanks for your great question!


For this sentence "tidigare" would be better to use.

If you want to use "innan", "innan" should be followed by something like "innan du började jobba här" or "innan jag började jobba här" (before you started working here, before I started working here).

If you want to use "innan", you need to specify "before what".


Tack så mycket, och lycka till!!


Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

Scotty
Sunday at 6:10 am
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Hej jag är Scotty och jag har en fråga. Kan du ersätta tidigare med innan? tack så mycket för en hjälpa


I hope I have everything correct. I was wondering if I could replace tidigare with innan? Or is tidigare the more appropriate word for this sentence? Thanks again!

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Friday at 5:46 pm
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Hej Gary!


That is a really good question!


Future tense in Swedish can be expressed in different ways. One way is to express it with the help of the auxiliary verb "ska" as you suggested. Another way to express future tense in Swedish is to use present form together with a time reference to in which it is clear that you are referring to something that is going to happen in the future. One example of this could be "Jag åker till Sverige på lördag" (I am going to Sweden on Saturday). However i the context in which the managers tells Lisa that he will call her the time reference is omitted since, it is clear that he is not actually calling her right now. I guess that "Jag ska ringa dig" grammatically corresponds better to "I will call you", but Swedes more often say "Jag ringer dig".


Hope that this made sense!


Keep up the great work Gary, it is nice to see how you are progressing!


Cheers,

Satsuki Team SwedishPod101.com

Gary
Tuesday at 8:45 pm
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Hej Allihopa


Jag har en annan fråga !


In the lesson, the manager says to Lisa, "Jag ringer dig", which is translated as, "I will call you".

As the manager is stating that he will call Lisa (in the future), should this not be expressed in the

future tense, ie, "Jag ska ringa dig" ?

Tack så mycket och hälsningar


Gary