Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Kellie: Hi everyone, and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Intermediate, Season 1 Lesson 15 - How Would You Describe Your Swedish Friend? Kellie here.
Vicky: Hej! I'm Vicky.
Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make an assumption in Swedish. The conversation takes place at a coffee shop.
Vicky: It's between Kalle and Annie.
Kellie: The speakers are friends, so they’ll use informal Swedish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Annie: Min kompis Hanna, hon har blivit ganska skum på senaste tiden.
Kalle: Vad menar du?
Annie: Hon är jättesmart, men ibland säger hon jättetokiga saker.
Kalle: Hon kanske bara är lite virrig?
Annie: Jo, kanske. Hon kanske bara är tankspridd?
Kalle: Det kan vara så. Hennes föräldrar håller på att skilja sig, eller hur?
Annie: Ja, hennes pappa är ganska våldsam och så. Hennes mamma fick väl nog.
Kalle: Synd. Jag har alltid gillat hennes mamma. Hon är alltid så munter. Hoppas skilsmässan inte går ut över Hanna för mycket.
Annie: Ja, för Hanna är ju en sån gullig person.
Kellie: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Annie: My friend Hanna, she’s become pretty weird lately.
Kalle: What do you mean?
Annie: She’s very smart, but sometimes she says really crazy things.
Kalle: She might just be a little scatterbrained?
Annie: Well, maybe. Maybe she is just a bit absent-minded?
Kalle: That may be. Her parents are in the middle of a divorce, right?
Annie: Yes, her dad is quite violent and so on. Her mother must have had enough.
Kalle: Too bad. I've always liked her mother. She’s always so cheerful. I hope the divorce doesn't affect Hanna too much.
Annie: Yeah, because Hanna is such a sweet person.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Kellie: Vicky, is divorce common in Sweden?
Vicky: According to a survey from 2014, approximately 27,000 people got married in Sweden that year, and about 24,000 couples divorced...
Kellie: That’s a lot! What about weddings? Do people have religious ceremonies?
Vicky: Sweden is a Christian country and most weddings take place in a church, though recently more people are choosing the option of civil marriage.
Kellie: How old do you have to be to get married in Sweden?
Vicky: You have to be 18 years old and have a marriage license to be allowed to get married.
Kellie: Is it legal to marry someone of the same sex in Sweden?
Vicky: Yes, and has been since 2009. Actually many people choose to not get married but still stay in a serious relationship and live together. There’s a special expression for that, att vara sambos. A sambo is the person you live with. Sambo comes from the Swedish words sam which means “together” and bo which means “live.” Sambo.
Kellie: So, it actually means “to live together,” and it’s a recognized relationship status in Sweden. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Kellie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Vicky: skum [natural native speed]
Kellie: weird, suspicious, strange
Vicky: skum [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: skum [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: tokig [natural native speed]
Kellie: crazy
Vicky: tokig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: tokig [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: virrig [natural native speed]
Kellie: scatterbrained
Vicky: virrig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: virrig [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: tankspridd [natural native speed]
Kellie: absent-minded
Vicky: tankspridd [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: tankspridd [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att skilja sig [natural native speed]
Kellie: to get a divorce
Vicky: att skilja sig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att skilja sig [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: våldsam [natural native speed]
Kellie: violent
Vicky: våldsam [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: våldsam [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att få nog [natural native speed]
Kellie: to have enough
Vicky: att få nog [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att få nog [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: synd [natural native speed]
Kellie: too bad
Vicky: synd [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: synd [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att gå ut över [natural native speed]
Kellie: to affect
Vicky: att gå ut över [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att gå ut över [natural native speed]
Kellie: And last..
Vicky: att hålla på [natural native speed]
Kellie: to be in the middle of
Vicky: att hålla på [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att hålla på [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Kellie: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Vicky: att gå ut över
Kellie: which means “to affect.”
Vicky: att means “to,” gå means “go,” “walk,” ut is “out” and över means “over.” Att gå ut över
Kellie: It means “to affect something in a negative way.”
Vicky: You can use it to talk about something having a negative effect on something else.
Kellie: Can we use it to talk about a positive effect?
Vicky: No, you can only use att gå ut över for negative results. It’s used in situations where your results are important, like school, sports, and work.
Kellie: Can you give us some examples?
Vicky: Sure. Din sömnbrist går ut över dina studieresultat.
Kellie: “Your lack of sleep is affecting your study results.”
Vicky: Låt inte festandet gå ut över arbetet.
Kellie: “Don't let your partying affect work.” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Vicky: att hålla på
Kellie: which means “to be in the middle of.” You can use it in informal situations to emphasize that you are in the middle of doing something.
Vicky: For example...Jag håller på att städa.
Kellie: “I'm in the middle of cleaning.”
Vicky: or Jag håller på att leta efter en ny bil.
Kellie: which means “I'm in the middle of looking for a new car.”
Vicky: It’s not usually used for expressing that you are not in the middle of doing something, but it can be used for that as well, though it isn’t as common. For example.. Jag håller inte på att måla ännu.
Kellie: “I'm not in the middle of painting yet.”
Vicky: att hålla på can also mean to cheer for someone or believe that someone will win. For example, you can say... Jag håller på det gröna laget.
Kellie: “I'm cheering for the green team.”
Vicky: att hålla på has one more meaning, though it isn’t used very often, which is “to keep” or “to hold.” For example.. Jag håller på mina pengar
Kellie: “I'm saving my money.” Okay, what's the last word?
Vicky: synd
Kellie: which means “too bad.” This word originally comes from Christianity and literally means “sin.” But it’s also become a popular expression meaning “too bad,” “what a shame,” or “how unfortunate.” You can use it when you hear bad news to show your disappointment in both formal and informal situations.
Vicky: synd is most commonly used together with the word vad, which means “what,” as in Vad synd!
Kellie: which is “What a shame!” in English. Can you give us an example using this word?
Vicky: Sure. For example, you can say.. Vad synd att du är upptagen i helgen.
Kellie: .. which means “Too bad you’re busy this weekend.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make an assumption in Swedish. When you want to make an assumption about other people or a situation you don’t know about personally, there are a few Swedish expressions that can come in handy.
Vicky: Here are some common words used in Swedish when making assumptions. First, Kanske.
Kellie: which means “Maybe, might,”
Vicky: Nog
Kellie: “probably,”
Vicky: Väl
Kellie: “surely,”
Vicky: Kan vara
Kellie: “could be.” These words can change the meaning of a sentence to an assumption.
Vicky: They usually follow the first verb in the sentence. Let’s consider the sentence Jag ska äta godis,
Kellie: which means “I’m going to eat candy.”
Vicky: By adding the word kanske
Kellie: which means “maybe,” “might,”
Vicky: ...you can change the sentence into Jag ska kanske äta godis.
Kellie: Meaning “I might eat candy.”
Vicky: Let's look at another example, Hämta min väska, den är på bordet.
Kellie: “Get my bag, it’s on the table.”
Vicky: Here we can also add the word Nog, which means “probably.” So then we get Hämta min väska, den är nog på bordet.
Kellie: The meaning changes to “Get my bag, it’s probably on the table.” In our dialogue, we also have the following examples…
Vicky: Hon kanske bara är lite virrig?
Kellie: “She might just be a little scatterbrained?”
Vicky: Hon kanske bara är tankspridd?
Kellie: “Maybe she is just a bit absent-minded?”
Vicky: Det kan vara så.
Kellie: “That may be.”
Vicky: Hennes mamma fick väl nog.
Kellie: “Her mother must have had enough.” Ok, let’s now switch to a different topic, talking about personality in Swedish. As we saw in the dialogue, there are a lot of adjectives you can use to describe yourself or someone you know.
Vicky: Here are some positive adjectives. Anpassningsbar
Kellie: which means “adaptable,”
Vicky: tillgiven
Kellie: meaning “affectionate,”
Vicky: modig
Kellie: meaning “brave,”
Vicky: Here are some adjectives with a negative meaning. Aggressiv
Kellie: which means “aggressive,”
Vicky: reserverad
Kellie: which means “aloof.” Listeners, you’ll find two complete lists in the lesson notes. Vicky, let’s finish with some examples that show how to use these adjectives in a complete sentence.
Vicky: Sure! Min mamma är omtänksam och osjälvisk.
Kellie: "My mom is thoughtful and unselfish."
Vicky: Jag tycker att den där mannen verkar misstänksam.
Kellie: "I think that man seems suspicious."

Outro

Kellie: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Vicky: Bye!

7 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Let's practice together in the comments!

Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 7:53 pm
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Hej Anthony,

We use the "att vara sambo" when two people live together in a relationship without being married. You also see the "sambor" for plural, but in everyday speech, we also often hear "sambos". Both options can be used. 😇


Vicky

Team SwedishPod101.com


Anthony
Wednesday at 9:52 pm
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"att vara sambos" är inte rätt, eller hur?

Team SwedishPod101.com
Thursday at 5:39 pm
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Hej Ayman,

Could you please let us know where in the lesson you found the mistake so that we can adjust it? 😇


Thank you!


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Ayman Debs
Monday at 5:24 pm
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Jag håller på att laga mat just nu. translation is wrong

Team Swedishpod101.com
Saturday at 1:00 am
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Hej Matyas,

"ju" doesn't actually have any meaning, it's used kind of like the English "yo". :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Matyas
Tuesday at 5:01 am
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Hi! what does "ju" mean in the last sentence precisely?

Tack för att förklara mig! :)