Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Kellie: Hi everyone, and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 21 - Making Requests at a Swedish Hotel. Kellie here.
Vicky: Hej! I'm Vicky.
Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make long sentences and requests in Swedish. The conversation takes place at a hotel.
Vicky: It's between Hanna and a receptionist.
Kellie: The speakers are strangers, so they’ll use both formal and informal Swedish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Hanna: Hej ursäkta, skulle ni kunna byta lakan i min säng? De blev bytta igår, men inte idag.
Receptionist: Vi byter vanligtvis lakan varannan dag, men vi kan byta dem åt dig idag också.
Hanna: Men städaren städar ju varje dag. Hon städar men byter inte lakan alltså?
Receptionist: Ja, exakt.
Hanna: Jaha, det var ju annorlunda.
Receptionist: Var det något mer?
Hanna: Ja, nu när jag ändå pratar med dig så kan jag passa på att beställa väckning tills imorgon.
Receptionist: Det går jättebra. Vilken tid vill du bli väckt?
Hanna: Eftersom vi ska fjällvandra tidigt imorgon vill jag bli väckt klockan 5 (fem) tack.
Receptionist: Vår väckningsservice är tyvärr från klockan 6 (sex). Är det okej?
Hanna: Nej, det var dåligt. Då får jag sätta alarmet på mobilen.
Kellie: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Hanna: Hi, excuse me, could you change the sheets in my bed? They got changed yesterday but not today.
Receptionist: We usually change the sheets every second day, but we can change them for you today as well.
Hanna: But the cleaner cleans every day. So she cleans but doesn't change the sheets?
Receptionist: Yes, exactly.
Hanna: Well, that’s different.
Receptionist: Was there anything else?
Hanna: Yes, now that I'm speaking to you, I can take the opportunity to order a wake-up call for tomorrow.
Receptionist: That's fine. What time do you want to get woken up?
Hanna: Since we’ll go hiking in the mountains early tomorrow, I'd like to be woken up at 5, thanks.
Receptionist: Unfortunately our wake-up calls are from 6. Is that okay?
Hanna: No, that won’t work. Then I'll have to set the alarm on my phone.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Kellie: Vicky, do Swedish people complain a lot?
Vicky: I would say complaints are a common part of Swedish life, especially in the big cities, and in my opinion Swedes always seem to have something to complain about.
Kellie: What are the main topics?
Vicky: The weather, bad or good, is always a safe topic to complain about, and so is the traffic. Complaints about service, and especially about public transportation, are also very common.
Kellie: In some countries complaints are expressed mildly and people try to be polite. Is it the same in Sweden?
Vicky: Actually Swedish people tend to be very straightforward and are not afraid to raise their voices, or spice their language up with curses. Because of the openness of complaints, some of the least appreciated workers like bus drivers or customer service reps hear many rude comments and complaints every day. Here is a good phrase to learn, Sluta klaga!
Kellie: which means "Stop complaining!” You can use it with your Swedish friends who complain a little too much. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Kellie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Vicky: att byta [natural native speed]
Kellie: to change
Vicky: att byta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att byta [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: vanligtvis [natural native speed]
Kellie: usually
Vicky: vanligtvis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: vanligtvis [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: städare [natural native speed]
Kellie: cleaner
Vicky: städare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: städare [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: annorlunda [natural native speed]
Kellie: different
Vicky: annorlunda [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: annorlunda [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: väckning [natural native speed]
Kellie: wake-up
Vicky: väckning [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: väckning [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att bli väckt [natural native speed]
Kellie: to be woken up
Vicky: att bli väckt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att bli väckt [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att fjällvandra [natural native speed]
Kellie: to hike
Vicky: att fjällvandra [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att fjällvandra [natural native speed]
Kellie: And last..
Vicky: att sätta [natural native speed]
Kellie: to set
Vicky: att sätta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att sätta [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Kellie: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Vicky: att byta
Kellie: which means “to change.” You can use it in both formal and informal situations when speaking about changing something. It could be changing clothes, or changing a product in a shop.
Vicky: Right. For example, you can say...Jag ska bara byta kläder
Kellie: “I'm just going to change my clothes”
Vicky: Går det bra att byta till en större storlek?
Kellie: ..which means “Would it be alright to change to a bigger size?” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Vicky: att sätta
Kellie: which means “to set” or “to put.” You can use it when you are putting something somewhere or turning a machine on.
Vicky: For example..Jag sätter på tvättmaskinen
Kellie: “I'm turning on the washing machine”
Vicky: Jag sätter alla saker på bordet
Kellie: “I'm putting all the things on the table.”
Vicky: Sätt din lillesyster i lekhagen.
Kellie: “Put your little sister in the playpen.”
Vicky: You can also use att sätta when charging an electronic device. For example, Jag sätter mobilen på laddning.
Kellie: which literally means “I'm putting my phone on to charge.”
Vicky: att sätta can also mean “to sit.” For example, Jag sätter mig på sängen.
Kellie: “I'm going to sit down on the bed”. Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make long sentences and requests in Swedish.
Vicky: In Swedish we sometimes use two main clauses in the same sentence instead of dividing them into two separate sentences.
Kellie: When you use two main clauses in one sentence, you need to use a linking word to combine them. Is there an example in the dialogue?
Vicky: Yes, for example, the receptionist says Vi byter vanligtvis lakan varannan dag, men vi kan byta dem åt dig idag också.
Kellie: “We usually change the sheets every second day, but we can change them for you today as well.”
Vicky: In this sentence the linking word is men, which means “but.”
Kellie: Basically, you can divide it into two separate sentences without this linking word.
Vicky: Right. For example, you can say...Vi byter vanligtvis lakan varannan dag, and then say Vi kan byta dem åt dig idag också.
Kellie: which respectively mean “We usually change sheets every second day” and “We can change them for you today as well.” Vicky, what are the most common linking words in Swedish?
Vicky: They are...Och
Kellie: which means “and”
Vicky: Men
Kellie: “but”
Vicky: Eller
Kellie: “or”
Vicky: Utan
Kellie: “without”
Vicky: För
Kellie: “because”
Vicky: Så
Kellie: “so.” Vicky, please give us an example.
Vicky: Sure. Städning sker mellan klockan tolv och klockan två och frukost serveras mellan sex och nio.
Kellie: which means “Cleaning takes place between twelve and two o'clock and breakfast is served from six to nine.” Ok, the next topic of this lesson is how to make requests in Swedish.
Vicky: In these cases you can use the expression Skulle jag kunna
Kellie: which means “Could I..?” or “May I…?” It’s a polite way of asking for or requesting something.
Vicky: It’s always good manners to start your request with Ursäkta mig
Kellie: which means “Excuse me.”
Vicky: For example, you can say...Ursäkta mig, skulle du kunna hjälpa mig?
Kellie: “Excuse me, could you help me, please?”
Vicky: Another example is...Ursäkta mig, skulle du kunna hjälpa mig att bära mitt bagage till rummet?
Kellie: “Excuse me, could you help me carry my luggage up to my room?”
Vicky: If you need to make a further request, as in the dialogue, you can say Nu när jag ändå pratar med dig så kan jag passa på att and then add your request.
Kellie: It means “now that I'm speaking to you, I can take the opportunity” plus your request.
Vicky: For example..Nu när jag ändå pratar med dig så kan jag passa på att fråga vart frukosten serveras.
Kellie: “Now that I’m speaking to you, I can take the opportunity to ask where breakfast is served.”
Vicky: Nu när du ändå ringde så vill jag passa på att fråga vad du har planerat för helgen.
Kellie: "Now that you’ve called, I'd like to take the opportunity to ask what you have planned for the weekend."

Outro

Kellie: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Vicky: Bye!

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Do you like complaining?