Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Kellie: Hi everyone, and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 3 - Are the Trains Delayed in Sweden? Kellie here.
Vicky: Hej! I'm Vicky.
Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use transitive and intransitive verbs. The conversation takes place at a train station.
Vicky: It's between Annie and Kalle.
Kellie: The speakers are friends listening to an announcement, so the announcement will be formal and they will using informal Swedish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Meddelande: På grund av löv på spåren är tåget mot Stockholm Östra 10 till 20 minuter försenat.
Annie: Men åå, inte igen! Det är alltid något fel på tågen.
Kalle: Ja, man kan tro att de aldrig sett löv förut, även fast hösten kommer varje år, samma tid.
Meddelande: Tåg mot Stockholm Östra ankommer till plattform två om cirka 10 minuter.
Annie: (paus) Å, äntligen kommer tåget! Jag fryser ihjäl!
Meddelande: Ta plats! Se upp för dörrarna. Dörrarna stängs.
Kellie: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Announcement: Due to leaves on the tracks, the train to Stockholm East will be delayed 10 to 20 minutes.
Annie: Gahh, not again! There’s always something wrong with the trains.
Kalle: Yeah, you might think that they've never seen leaves before, even though autumn comes at the same time every year.
Announcement: The train to Stockholm East will arrive at platform two in about 10 minutes.
Annie: (pause) Oh, the train is finally coming! I’m freezing to death!
Announcement: Take your places! Watch out for the doors. The doors are closing.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Kellie: Vicky, what are the most common means of public transportation in Sweden?
Vicky: The three most common forms of public transportation are the bus, train, and metro. In some areas, trams and ferries are also used.
Kellie: What about Stockholm?
Vicky: Since Stockholm is surrounded by water, it has all of them!
Kellie: Are delays as common as they say in the dialogue?
Vicky: Yes, delays are very common throughout the country, but in the capital it has become a sort of joke because most of the time the delays seem to be caused by ridiculous things like mist, leaves on the tracks, or snow.
Kellie: Sweden is a cold country, so it’s no surprise that there’s a lot of snow, right?
Vicky: Right, but every year the public transportation has bad delays and cancelled departures, as if the winter has come as a surprise. Another thing that the locals seem to think of as a bad joke is the cost of public transportation.
Kellie: How much is it?
Vicky: A monthly pass in Stockholm that can be used for the train, bus, metro, and so on, is 790 Swedish crowns, about 93 USD, which the locals think is absolutely outrageous considering the constant delays.
Kellie: I see. Can you tell us the Swedish word for "delayed train"?
Vicky: It’s Försenat tåg.
Kellie: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Kellie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Vicky: spår [natural native speed]
Kellie: track
Vicky: spår[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: spår [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: försenat [natural native speed]
Kellie: delayed
Vicky: försenat[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: försenat [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: inte igen [natural native speed]
Kellie: not again
Vicky: inte igen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: inte igen [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: på grund av [natural native speed]
Kellie: due to
Vicky: på grund av[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: på grund av [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: förut [natural native speed]
Kellie: before
Vicky: förut[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: förut [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att ankomma [natural native speed]
Kellie: to arrive
Vicky: att ankomma[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att ankomma [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: plattform [natural native speed]
Kellie: platform
Vicky: plattform[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: plattform [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: äntligen [natural native speed]
Kellie: finally
Vicky: äntligen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: äntligen [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Vicky: att frysa ihjäl [natural native speed]
Kellie: to freeze to death
Vicky: att frysa ihjäl[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att frysa ihjäl [natural native speed]
Kellie: And last..
Vicky: att se upp [natural native speed]
Kellie: to watch out
Vicky: att se upp[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att se upp [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Kellie: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Vicky: på grund av
Kellie: meaning "due to."
Vicky: På grund av literally means "on grounds of."
Kellie: You can use this expression to explain that something happens because of something else. It’s mostly used in a negative way.
Vicky: Right, you shouldn't use this expression when the outcome is positive. In that case you would use Tack vare,
Kellie: which means “thanks to.” Can you give us an example using both these phrases?
Vicky: Sure. For example, you can say.. På grund av dåligt väder är picknicken inställd.
Kellie: ..which means "Due to bad weather, the picnic is cancelled."
Vicky: Tack vare min skönhet har jag många beundrare
Kellie: ..which means "Thanks to my beauty I've got many admirers"
Kellie: Okay, what's the next word?
Vicky: Äntligen
Kellie: meaning "Finally " or “at last.”
Vicky: You can use this when you want to express that you’ve been waiting for something, and it’s finally happening. We use it in a positive way. You may also use this word as an interjection.
Kellie: Can you give us an example using this word?
Vicky: Sure. For example, you can say.. Äntligen har jag en ledig dag!
Kellie: .. which means "Finally I have a day off!"
Vicky: Another phrase that means “finally” or “in the end” is Till slut. For example, you can say Jag gick till slut med på att hjälpa min kompis
Kellie: “In the end I agreed to help my friend”.
Kellie: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Vicky: att frysa ihjäl
Kellie: meaning "to freeze to death."
Vicky: We use this expression when we want to express the feeling of being really cold.
Kellie: Can you give us an example using this word?
Vicky: Sure. For example, you can say.. Stockholm är så kallt att jag tror att jag fryser ihjäl!
Kellie: .. which means "Stockholm is so cold that I think I will freeze to death!"
Kellie: Can you express other feelings by using similar phrases?
Vicky: You can use other verbs in this phrase instead of att frysa, "to be cold," such as att svettas
Kellie: "to sweat,"
Vicky: and att svälta
Kellie: "to starve." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Kellie: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use transitive and intransitive verbs and we’ll also talk about the imperative. Let’s start with transitive verbs.
Vicky: Transitive verbs are verbs that can have one or several direct objects.
Kellie: They need to have an action verb that expresses something you can do, and a direct object that receives the action of the verb. Do we have an example in the dialogue?
Vicky: Yes, Man kan tro att de aldrig sett löv förut, även fast hösten kommer varje år, samma tid.
Kellie: “You might think that they’ve never seen leaves before, even though autumn comes at the same time every year.”
Vicky: In this sentence, the verb is sett which is the past tense of the verb se, which means “to see” and the object is löv, meaning “leaves.”
Kellie: The object receives the action of the verb, which is “to see leaves.” Can we have some other examples?
Vicky: Flickan läser en jättelång bok.
Kellie: "The girl is reading a very long book."
Vicky: Lisa bakar kakor varje dag.
Kellie: "Lisa is baking cookies every day." We can use transitive verbs in absolute terms, too. This happens when a direct object does not follow the transitive verb. In this case, the verb simply indicates what action the subject performs.
Vicky: For example, Flickan läser.
Kellie: Which means "The girl is reading."
Vicky: Lisa bakar.
Kellie: meaning "Lisa is baking."
Vicky: Other transitive verbs are bränna and slå
Kellie: Respectively meaning “to burn” and “to hit.” Let’s now look at intransitive verbs.
Vicky: Intransitive verbs are those verbs which a direct object cannot follow.
Kellie: In many cases, an adverb or an adverbial phrase follows. It has an action verb, but no direct object.
Vicky: An example in the dialogue is Jag fryser ihjäl!
Kellie: meaning “I’m freezing to death!”
Vicky: Other examples would be John sover i sängen.
Kellie: "John is sleeping in his bed."
Vicky: Alla barnen sitter i klassrummet.
Kellie: "All the kids are sitting in the classroom."
Vicky: Some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive.
Kellie: Could you give us an example?
Vicky: Yes, for example slutar. Here’s a sentence. Jag slutade skolan när jag var 10 år.
Kellie: which means “I quit school when I was 10 years old,” and shows the verb used as transitive.
Vicky: Sagan slutar lyckligt.
Kellie: which means “The fairy tale ends happily,” and shows the verb used as intransitive.
Vicky: Other intransitive verbs are brinna and ligga,
Kellie: respectively meaning “to burn” and “to lie.” Ok, now let’s talk about the imperative.
Vicky: The Swedish imperative is the shortest verb form, and it’s important because you always build other verb forms using the imperative form.
Kellie: Is there an example in the dialogue?
Vicky: Yes, it’s Ta plats!
Kellie: meaning “Take your places!” The imperative is used when you want someone to do something. That’s why using the imperative form as it is when you ask for a favor can be considered as a little rude.
Vicky: Right, so we often use forms like Skulle du kunna…
Kellie: meaning “Would you be able to…”
Vicky: or Kan du vara snäll och…
Kellie: “Would you be so kind and…”
Vicky: In announcements in stations and such, the speakers often use the imperative form without adding polite words. This isn’t considered rude.
Kellie: We heard that in the dialogue. Ok, let’s wrap up this lesson with some sample sentences that show what we’ve explained.
Vicky: Jag ska se film med min bror imorgon.
Kellie: "I'm going to watch a movie with my brother tomorrow."
Vicky: Emil ligger alltid i sängen och kollar på TV.
Kellie: "Emil always lies in bed and watches TV."
Vicky: Kom hit! Du vet att du inte får springa så långt bort!
Kellie: "Come here! You know you're not allowed to run that far away!"

Outro

Kellie: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Vicky: Bye!

7 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Let us know if you have any questions.

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 5:35 pm
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Hej Steve,

I see now what you mean. Thank you for clarifying! 😇 You are absolutely right, that is how you would correctly write it. In Swedish we do tend to "skip" the "ha" here. Actually, we do tend to skip quite a few things when we speak informally, most likely to simplify. Language is a changing thing and it's funny to see how these things keep changing. Thank you for your comment!👍


VickyT

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Steve Scott
Wednesday at 8:07 pm
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Hi Vicky,

the supine is used without the verb "att ha". The correct sentence should be "Ja, man kan tro att de aldrig HAR sett löv förut." I have heard the supine used without the verb "att ha" quite a lot recently, but strictly, it is incorrect grammatically.

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:08 pm
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Hej Scott,

Thank you for your comment. I can only see the sentence below in the transcript, and that is correct. Were you referring to another sentence? 😇


"Ja, man kan tro att de aldrig sett löv förut" (Yes, you'd think they've never seen leaves before.)


VickyT

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Steve Scott
Monday at 6:37 pm
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Kalle använder oriktig grammatik när han säger ”de aldrig sett löv förut”. Det skulle vara ”de aldrig såg löv förut”, eller ”de aldrig har sett löv förut”. Många gånger nyligen har jag hört svensk människor använda supinet utan verbet ”att ha” när de pratar om förgångna händelser.


Kalle is using incorrect grammar when he says ”de aldrig sett löv förut”. It should be”de aldrig såg löv förut”, or ”de aldrig har sett löv förut”. Many times recently I have heard Swedish people use the supine without the verb “to have” when talking about past events.


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Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 5:04 pm
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Hej Greg,

You're absolutely right! We usually say "sluta skolan" when we mean actually finish a grade, or graduate. Vi also use it before a long school holiday. 😇


VickyT

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Greg
Monday at 9:11 am
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Seems to me that slutar skolan also means graduate from school.