Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Kellie: Hi everyone, and welcome back to SwedishPod101.com This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 4 - A Little Accident in Sweden. Kellie Here.
Vicky: Hej! I'm Vicky.
Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the past tense and about explaining and giving solutions to problems. The conversation takes place at a workplace.
Vicky: It's between Lennart and Frida.
Kellie: The speakers are co-workers, so they’ll use informal Swedish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Lennart: Oj, förlåt, jag såg dig inte!
FridVicky: Å, du spillde ditt kaffe över hela min vita fina klänning! Jag har ingenting att byta om till! Vad ska jag göra?
Lennart: Jag ber så hemskt mycket om ursäkt! Du kan få låna min skjorta.
FridVicky: Nej, den vill jag inte ha på mig. Åh, den här klänningen fick jag av min dotter i födelsedagspresent förra året. Nu är den förstörd.
Lennart: Det visste jag inte. Hur mycket kostade den? Jag kan köpa dig en ny!
FridVicky: Nej, det är okej. Förlåt, jag överreagerade lite. Fläcken går nog bort i tvätten.
Lennart: Jag hoppas verkligen det. Säg till annars, så löser vi det.
Kellie: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Lennart: Oops, sorry, I didn't see you!
FridVicky: Oh, you spilled your coffee all over my beautiful white dress! I've got nothing to change into! What should I do?
Lennart: I’m so very sorry! You can borrow my shirt.
FridVicky: No, I don't want to wear that. Oh, I got this dress from my daughter for my birthday last year. Now it's ruined.
Lennart: I didn't know that. How much did it cost? I can buy you a new one!
FridVicky: No, it's fine. Sorry, I overreacted a bit. The stain will probably go away in the wash.
Lennart: I really hope so. Let me know if it doesn't, and we'll solve it.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Kellie: Vicky, do Swedes get angry easily?
Vicky: Well, Swedes are human, so of course we get upset sometimes. What’s commonly said about Swedes though, is that we don't show it that much. We would rarely start a fight with someone we don't know too well, and wouldn't complain loudly in a restaurant or supermarket.
Kellie: But is there any time you like to complain?
Vicky: We like to complain about bad service, bad quality, and other things to our friends.
Kellie: In other words - Swedes like to avoid conflict but love to complain....
Vicky: (laughs) That’s right! So in general, if you happen to upset a Swedish person, just let them know that you’re very sorry, and didn't mean what you did. It's pretty simple, and Swedes tend to forgive.
Kellie: What’s a phrase to apologize with?
Vicky: Jag ber om ursäkt,
Kellie: which means "I ask to be forgiven." Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Kellie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Vicky: att spilla [natural native speed]
Kellie: to spill
Vicky: att spilla[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att spilla [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: att byta om [natural native speed]
Kellie: to change
Vicky: att byta om[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att byta om [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: att be om ursäkt [natural native speed]
Kellie: to apologize
Vicky: att be om ursäkt[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att be om ursäkt [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: att låna [natural native speed]
Kellie: to borrow
Vicky: att låna[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att låna [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: att ha på sig [natural native speed]
Kellie: to wear
Vicky: att ha på sig[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att ha på sig [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: fläck [natural native speed]
Kellie: stain
Vicky: fläck[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: fläck [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: förstörd [natural native speed]
Kellie: ruined
Vicky: förstörd[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: förstörd [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: att överreagera [natural native speed]
Kellie: to overreact
Vicky: att överreagera[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att överreagera [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have...
Vicky: att lösa [natural native speed]
Kellie: to solve
Vicky: att lösa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att lösa [natural native speed]
Kellie: And last...
Vicky: att säga till [natural native speed]
Kellie: to let know, to tell
Vicky: att säga till[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Vicky: att säga till [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Kellie: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Vicky: att överreagera
Kellie: meaning "to overreact."
Vicky:This verb is formed by the words över meaning "over" and reagera meaning "react."
Kellie: You use this when you want to express that someone is reacting to something more intensely than they should. It's commonly used in a negative way. Can you give us an example using this word?
Vicky: For example, you can say... Det är inte så farligt, du överreagerar bara.
Kellie: ...which means "It's not that bad, you're just overreacting."
Vicky: You can use the över- together with other words as well, to imply that someone is doing something to much. For example, att överanalysera
Kellie: "to overanalyse"
Vicky: att överspela
Kellie: "to overact." can also be used to describe an actor who is overacting their role. Okay, what's the next phrase?
Vicky: att säga till
Kellie: meaning "to let someone know." Can you give us an example using this word?
Vicky: For example, you can say... Säg till om du inte hinner i tid till föreställningen.
Kellie: ... which means "Let me know if you can't make it in time for the show. "
Vicky: It can also be used as "to tell someone to do," or "to order," for example Säg till ditt barn att vara tyst!
Kellie: “Tell your child to be quiet!" Okay, what's the next phrase?
Vicky: att lösa
Kellie: meaning "to solve," to fix a problem and make something better.
Vicky: Att lösa in its imperative form lös is the same as att lysa, the word for “shine” in the past tense, so be careful to not mix them up!
Kellie: What’s an example using this word?
Vicky: You can say... Om du ringer till polisen, så tror jag de kan lösa det!
Kellie: ... which means "If you call the police, I think they can solve it!"
Vicky: Att lösa is rarely used as "to unravel," but sometimes it is, as in Om din sko är för tight, lös lite på skosnöret!
Kellie: Which means "If your shoe is too tight, untie the shoelace a bit!" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Kellie: In this lesson, you'll learn about past tense, explaining and giving solutions to problems. When something that creates trouble happens, like in the dialogue, you may need to use the past tense to explain what happened or to excuse yourself.
Vicky: For example, in the dialogue Lennart said Jag såg dig inte!
Kellie: which means “I didn’t see you!”
Vicky: And Frida, who explained what happened, said Du spillde ditt kaffe över hela min vita fina klänning.
Kellie: meaning “You spilled your coffee all over my beautiful white dress!”
Vicky: Såg is the past tense of se and spillde is the past tense of spilla.
Kellie: Let’s look now at how to make sentences in the past tense in Swedish.
Vicky: We mainly use the preteritum or past tense to describe actions or conditions that have already happened.
Kellie: It is important to note that the preterite tense in Swedish describes both completed and uncompleted actions, and the ending of the verb stays the same regardless of whether the action was completed. But before we look at how to change verbs into their preterite tense, we should mention a few things. First, we can divide the verbs used in Swedish into four groups.
Vicky: We usually refer to the first three groups as weak verbs, while the fourth group contains irregular verbs, also referred to as strong verbs. In this lesson's dialogue, three irregular verbs are introduced - var, gjorde, and åt.
Kellie: Which mean “was,” “did,” and “ate,” respectively. In this lesson we’ll look at how verbs belonging to the first three groups, the weak verbs, change into their preterite tense and leave out the conjugation rules for the irregular verbs.
Vicky: It’s simple. Most of the verbs in their preterite tense in Swedish take a -de ending or a -te ending.
Kellie: Let’s go through this group by group.
Vicky: The first type of verbs we’re going to look at are the verbs whose stem ends in an -a. To change these verbs into their preterite tense, you simply add the ending -de to the verb stem.
Kellie: Are there any examples from this group in the dialogue?
Vicky: Yes, we have spillde, which is the preterite of spilla, meaning “to spill” and betalade, which is the preterite form of betala, meaning “to pay.”
Kellie: The second type are verbs that end in a consonant. But we can divide this group into two subgroups.
Vicky: Right, the first group is the verbs whose stem ends in a voiced consonant, which take the ending -de in the preterite tense. The second group of verbs whose stem ends in a consonant are the verbs with an unvoiced consonant, -k, -p, -s, or -t. This kind of verb in the preterite tense takes the ending -te.
Kellie: Can we have an example for the first subgroup?
Vicky: att känna, meaning “to feel,” becomes kände in the preterite because its stem is känn.
Kellie: And what about the second subgroup?
Vicky: att köpa, meaning “to buy,” becomes köpte in the preterite as its stem is köp.
Kellie: Ok, let’s take a look at the third group of weak verbs.
Vicky: The third type of verbs are the verbs whose stem ends in a vowel other than -a. This type of verb takes a -dde ending in the preterite tense. For example att tro, meaning “to believe,” becomes trodde in the preterite, as its stem is tro.
Kellie: Ok. In the second half of the lesson, we’ll see useful apologetic phrases that can come in handy.
Vicky: First of all, we should use Ursäkta in formal situations, such as when we bump into someone by mistake. For example, in the dialogue Lennart apologizes by saying Jag ber så hemskt mycket om ursäkt.
Kellie: which literally means “I beg so horribly much to be forgiven,” but means something like “I am so very sorry.”
Vicky: This phrase is not usually used among friends since it’s a fairly polite phrase. You should use it with strangers or at the workplace.
Kellie: What are some expressions we should use when we’ve done something bad?
Vicky: Finns det något jag kan göra?
Kellie: “Is there anything I can do?”
Vicky: Jag hoppas det löser sig!
Kellie: “I hope it works out!” What are the answers we should wait for?
Vicky: Det är okej.
Kellie: “It’s okay.”
Vicky: Förlåt, jag överreagerade lite.
Kellie: “Sorry, I overreacted a bit.”
Vicky: Det blir nog bra.
Kellie: “I’m sure it will be fine.”
Vicky: Oroa dig inte för det.
Kellie: “Don’t worry about it.”

Outro

Kellie: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Vicky: Bye!

19 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Try to write a sentence in Swedish using the past tense.

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 4:28 pm
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Hej Sedef,


"Säga åt" is something we use when we tell someone off for doing something bad.


You could say: Du trampade precis på min fot, även fast jag sa till dig att vara försiktig. But it doesn't have the same level of "lecturing" or sternness. I hope this helps. 😇


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

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Sedef
Monday at 8:45 pm
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"Du trampade precis på min fot, även fast jag sa åt dig att vara försiktig."

Kan man använda 'till dig' istället för 'åt dig'? Vad är skillnaden?


Tackar

//Sedef

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 7:44 pm
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Hej Melinda,

Du är väldigt observant! (You're very observant!) 👍


Let us know if you have any questions and we'll do our best to answer them! 😇


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

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Melinda D.
Monday at 3:06 pm
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Med den adjektiven det är intressant hur ”vit” kommer föra ”fin” när hon beskriver klänningen i svenska. Men i engelska det ska bli en annan ordning. Varför? Det vet inte jag...det låter bättre som det här. T.ex. ”the beautiful white dress”. Of course there are rules for order for multiple adjectives, but at this level it’s fun just noticing the small differences of syntax.

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 12:33 am
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Hej Alan,


That's a really good question.


I actually had to do quite a bit of research for this one. I believe that "spill - spilla - spiller - spillde- spillt" actually belongs to the second group of verbs and that there is a mistake in the lesson.


I hope this helps, and I will bring this up with administration too. It's always a good idea to point out if something seems unclear. Please let me know if you have any other questions.


VickyT

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Alan
Monday at 9:23 pm
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Hej Vicky,

Jag ville skriva det i svenska, men det är för komplicerad.

Man läser, ”To change these verbs into their preterite tense, you simply add the ending -de to the verb stem.” Then come the examples: spilla > spillde and betala > betalade. But the two examples are different and leave some unanswered questions: Does the verb stem end in the consonant, “ll” as in spilla, or “l” as in betala? Or does it end in “a”? Spilla drops its “a” to become spillde, but betala keep its “a” to become betalade?

Vicky, jag förstår inte. Har jag missat något? Kan du förklara, tack.

Alan

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Sunday at 12:58 am
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Hej Christian,

Tummen upp till dig, du är så observant! Din kommentar kommer säkert att vara hjälpsam för andra som studerar svenska också. (Thumbs up for you, you're very observant! I'm sure your comment will be helpful for others who are studying Swedish too.)


VickyT

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Sunday at 12:57 am
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Hej Christian,

Ja det är rätt roligt det här med språk ibland. Ditt exempel med Gamla stan är väldigt roligt, men en sådan där typisk grej som är konstig när man lär sig ett nytt språk. (Yes, languages can be pretty funny sometimes. Your example with Gamla stan is very funny, it's one of those typical strange things you have to learn when learning a new language.)


Du har nästan helt rätt!

Vi säger "min vita skjorta" eftersom att det bara är en skjorta, men är det plural säger du "mina vita skjortor". (You're almost completely right! We say "min vita skjorta" (my white shirt) because it's only one shirt, but if it's plural you say "mina vita skjortor" (my white shirts).

You can also say "den här vita skjortan" (this white shirt) and "en vit skjorta" (a white shirt).


Bra jobbat!

VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

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Christian Barrette
Thursday at 7:28 am
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Sorry. In my first paragraph, it should read "min vita skjorta".

-- Christian (B->

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Christian Barrette
Wednesday at 10:02 am
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Tack Vicky ! Det är något jag hade lärt mig men plötsligt glömt. Är det inte säkert att man ska säga "mina vita skjorta" men "den här vita skjortan", och "en vit skjorta"?

I remember I had to understand why it is that in Stockholm there is a "Gamla Stan", and not a gammal stad. Because it is THE one and only gamla stan!

Om jag har det fel, tack för att korrigera mig.

-- Christian (B->