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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Engla: Hej allihopa! I’m Engla.
Gabriella: Hi everyone, I’m Gabriella. Welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 11 - Swedish Candy Is Worth Fighting Over! In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about the location of an object.
Engla: Yes, and the conversation takes place at the Olsson family’s home.
Gabriella It’s between Anna and her brother Jens, and they're using informal Swedish because they’re family.
DIALOGUE
Anna: Har du tagit min godispåse?
Jens: Nej, det här är min godispåse.
Anna: Nej, det där är min godispåse.
Jens: Sluta! Godispåsen där borta är din godispåse.
Anna: Lägg av! Ge mig min godispåse!
Jens: Mamma! Pappa! Anna försöker ta min godispåse!
-With English Translation-
Anna: Har du tagit min godispåse?
Gina: Have you taken my bag of candy?
Jens: Nej, det här är min godispåse.
Gina: No, this one here is my bag of candy.
Anna: Nej, det där är min godispåse.
Gina: No, that one there is my bag of candy.
Jens: Sluta! Godispåsen där borta är din godispåse.
Gina: Stop it! The candy bag over there is your bag of candy.
Anna: Lägg av! Ge mig min godispåse!
Gina: Cut it out! Give me my bag of candy!
Jens: Mamma! Pappa! Anna försöker ta min godispåse!
Gina: Mom! Dad! Anna is trying to take my bag of candy!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gabriella: Wow, Anna and Jens are really fighting over that candy, so it must be good. Engla, what kind of candy is popular in Sweden?
Engla: Well something that's really popular is pick-n-mix, which in Swedish is lösgodis or plockgodis, and we have a long tradition of eating that.
Gabriella: Really?
Engla: Yes, in fact it was originally sold behind the counter in stores, and was becoming really common by the 1930s.
Gabriella: I see. But nowadays it's not sold behind the counter, is it?
Engla: No, that changed in 1985 when stores started to sell it so that the customers could pick and mix by themselves. And after that it really gained in popularity.
Gabriella: Okay and how much pick-n-mix do Swedes eat
Engla: Well, it's been calculated that 100 million bags of pick-n-mix are sold each year, and that the average weight of each bag is 350 g.
Gabriella: Wow! That's actually quite a lot considering the Swedish population is about 9 million.
Engla: Yes. Statistics also show that the candy is most popular among youths and women between the ages of 25 to 60 years old.
Gabriella: That’s interesting. Make sure you try some Swedish candy when you go to Sweden, listeners!
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gabriella: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Engla: The first word we’re going to talk about is the word Sluta!
Gabriella: And that means “Stop it!”
Engla: It sure does.
Gabriella: This must be a really good way of telling someone to stop with whatever they're doing.
Engla: Well, I think it’s probably a very effective way, but I wouldn't advise you to use it with people you don’t know well, because it can sound pretty rude.
Gabriella: I see. I’ll remember that. Now, what word do we have next?
Engla: Next we have the very versatile Swedish verb att ta.
Gabriella: Versatile? I know it can mean “to take,” like it was used in this lesson’s dialog, but can it also mean something else?
Engla: Yes, it can also mean things like “to bring,” “to accept,” or even “to catch.”
Gabriella: Really? Well, I won't be able to remember all of that now.
Engla: That’s totally understandable. But at least now, you'll be aware that att ta can have more than one meaning.
Gabriella: That’s true. Now, let’s move on to the next word.
Engla: The last thing we’ll talk about is the interjection Lägg av!
Gabriella: Meaning “Cut it out!”
Engla: Yes, and the usage of this is similar to how you'd use Sluta!
Gabriella: So don’t use it with people you don’t know?
Engla: Well, not unless your intention is to sound rude.
Gabriella: Okay, now onto the grammar.
VOCAB LIST
Gabriella: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is…
Engla: att ta [natural native speed]
Gabriella: to take
Engla: att ta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: att ta [natural native speed]
Engla: godispåse [natural native speed]
Gabriella: bag of candy, candy bag
Engla: godispåse [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: godispåse [natural native speed]
Engla: Sluta! [natural native speed]
Gabriella: Stop it!
Engla: Sluta! [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: Sluta! [natural native speed]
Engla: Lägg av! [natural native speed]
Gabriella: Cut it out!
Engla: Lägg av! [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: Lägg av! [natural native speed]
Engla: här [natural native speed]
Gabriella: here
Engla: här [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: här [natural native speed]
Engla: där [natural native speed]
Gabriella: there
Engla: där [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: där [natural native speed]
Engla: där borta [natural native speed]
Gabriella: over there
Engla: där borta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: där borta [natural native speed]
Engla: att försöka [natural native speed]
Gabriella: to try
Engla: att försöka [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: att försöka [natural native speed]
Engla: att ge [natural native speed]
Gabriella: to give
Engla: att ge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: att ge [natural native speed]
Engla: nej [natural native speed]
Gabriella: no
Engla: nej [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Engla: nej [natural native speed]

Lesson focus

Gabriella: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the location of an object. How do we do that, Engla?
Engla: Well, we use the adverbs här, meaning "here," där, meaning "there," and där borta, meaning "over there." All of which indicate the location of an object in relation to the speaker.
Gabriella: I see. You mean like how Jens and Anna use them in this lesson’s dialog when they're talking about the bag of candy?
Engla: Exactly!
Gabriella: For example, Anna said “No, this one here is my bag of candy.”
Engla: Which was Nej, det här är min godispåse. Let’s practice saying that together.
Gabriella: Sure! Listeners, please repeat after Engla.
Engla: Nej, det här är min godispåse.
Gabriella: Jens also said, “No, that one there is my bag of candy.” What was that in Swedish?
Engla: Nej, det är min godispåse. Listeners, repeat after me please. Nej, det är min godispåse.
Gabriella: The adverb “over there” was also used by Anna when she said “The candy bag over there is your bag of candy.”
Engla: Yes, and it was Godispåsen där borta är din godispåse.
Gabriella: Listeners, repeat after Engla.
Engla: Godispåsen där borta är din godispåse.
Gabriella: Okay, now that we hopefully have a better understanding of the purpose of these adverbs, should we move on and learn how to use them in a sentence to talk about the location of an object?
Engla: I think that sounds like a good idea! For the purpose of this lesson, we’ll use sentence structures like Nyckeln är här, meaning "The key is here" and Väskan är där, meaning "The bag is there."
Gabriella: I see. In other words that means we’ll use sentences that start with a noun in its definite singular form?
Engla: Correct! This noun is then followed by the present tense of the verb att vara, or "to be," namely är.
Gabriella: And finally we’ll use the adverbs “here,” “there,” or “over there” depending on where the object we're talking about is in relation to the speaker.
Engla: Precisely.
Gabriella: Now that we have the sentence structure down, let’s put it to use!
Engla: Absolutely, and we’ll start with the adverb här, or "here," which of course is used when talking about an object that's close to the speaker.
Gabriella: Okay, how would I say, “The book is here”?
Engla: “The book” in Swedish is boken, and här is "here." So “The book is here” in Swedish is Boken är här.
Gabriella: That wasn't’ too difficult, but let’s practice saying that once.
Engla: Sure! Listeners, please repeat after me! Boken är här.
Gabriella: How would you say, “The bag is here”?
Engla: “The bag” is väskan, so you'd say, Väskan är här. Listeners, repeat after me please. Väskan är här.
Gabriella: Now, how about the Swedish adverb for “there”?
Engla: Yes, där is an adverb that's used to talk about an object that's located away from the speaker.
Gabriella: But not that far away right?
Engla: That’s correct.
Gabriella: Okay, I want to use this adverb together with the noun “the book” to say, “The book is there.”
Engla: Sure! "The book" is boken, and “there” is där, so “The book is there” in Swedish is Boken är där.
Gabriella: Listeners, repeat after Engla.
Engla: Boken är där.
Gabriella: How about “The bag is there”?
Engla: Väskan är där. Listeners, repeat after me please. Väskan är där.
Gabriella: Okay, now we have the Swedish adverb “over there” left.
Engla: Precisely!
Gabriella: And I guess this one is used when we're talking about something that's located far away from the speaker?
Engla: You’re absolutely right!
Gabriella: So how do you say, “The book is over there,” then?
Engla: “Over there” in Swedish is där borta, so you would say, Boken är där borta.
Gabriella: Listeners, repeat after Engla please.
Engla: Boken är där borta.
Gabriella: What about “The bag is over there.” How do you say that?
Engla: Väskan är där borta. Listeners repeat after me please. Väskan är där borta.

Outro

Gabriella: Great! That’s all for this lesson.
Engla: Yes, I think so. Great work everyone.
Gabriella: Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Engla: Hej då!

14 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Hello Listeners! Have you tried Swedish candies?

Team Swedishpod101.com
Friday at 11:09 pm
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Hej Anders,

Inga problem! (No problems!)

Let me know if you have any other questions. :innocent:


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Anders
Thursday at 8:32 pm
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Thank you so much Vicky!!!!!:smile:

Team Swedishpod101.com
Thursday at 9:47 am
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Hej Anders,

If you speak properly and clearly in Swedish, then the "är" is pronounced very similarly to the English "air". However, in informal speech, or when people speak quickly "är" tends to become just "e".


For example: Vad är det där? becomes Va äre där? or Vad e de där? when speaking.


However, your before mentioned Det här är becoming där is not a contraction, it is just how it comes off in the dialog. We apologize if it's not clear enough. We're continuously trying to add more lessons and information on the webpage, we'll keep in mind your request.


Thank you,

VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Anders
Tuesday at 10:39 am
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Also in the second sentence the three words "Det här är" sounds like it becomes one word "Där" with a longer r. This then takes three syllables and makes them one. Is this a standard contraction or just the way it is said in this dialog? Is there somewhere on Swedish Pod 101 where we can find a collection of these contractions?


Tack!

Anders
Tuesday at 10:33 am
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Because there is so much "är" use in this lesson, I would like to ask a question about the pronunciation of är.


In some cases I hear people pronounce är as the English word "air" and at other times like in this lesson as the English sound for the letter R.


Which is right? I would love to put this behind me and move on, but until I get this clear I get so mixed up.


Tack!

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Saturday at 12:00 am
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Hej Adolf,

När du pratar med barn som inte uppför sig så kan du säga sluta eller lägg av. Vänta lite har en liten annan betydelse. (When you speak to children that aren't behaving you can say "sluta" (Stop) or "lägg av" (stop it). "Vänta lite" (Wait a little) has a bit of a different meaning.)


VickyT

Team Swedishpod101.com

Adolf
Tuesday at 9:12 pm
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humm... "Sluta" och "Lägg av" är oförskämd...


Vad sägs om "Vänta lite"?:smile:

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 2:54 pm
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Hej Yolande!


Ah, jag glömde den! Ursäkta mig!


"att verka" betyder att du tror att någonting är så. På engelska "to seem". Det är inte 100% säkert, men det ser ut så.

Om du ser ett högt berg, kanske du säger "det verkar farligt att klättra upp".

Om du har träffat din väninnas vän, och du tycker att hon är trevlig, kan du säga till din väninna: "Jag tycker din vän verkar trevlig".


Hoppas det var en okej förklaring!

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

Yolande Brunelle
Saturday at 1:41 am
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Hej,

Ja tack. Det är klar.

Och att verka?? När använder du det?


Yolande

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 8:32 pm
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Hejsan Yolande!


Det är bra tack! Hur är det med dig?


Jag hoppas du får chansen att smaka svenskt godis någon gång! :innocent:


Jag rättar din mening lite!

"Nej tyvärr har jag aldrig smakat svenska godis. De ser bra ut."

Nej tyvärr har jag aldrig smakat svenskt godis. Det ser gott ut.


Svar på din fråga:

Du kan säga "Det ser gott ut", "du ser glad ut", när du ser objektet eller personen, och du vill kommentera det du ser. "Det ser farligt ut", "Det ser kallt ut" etc.


Du kan säga "Det låter bra" etc när du har hört någonting och vill kommentera det. Om någon berättar om en idé de har, kan du säga "det låter som en bra idé". Om någon berättar om sin kompis, kan du säga "Han låter som en trevlig person".


"Tycker" eller "att tycka", kan användas på jättemånga olika sätt!

Du kan säga "Jag tycker att du är tråkig" etc när du vill berätta någonting som du själv tycker. "Jag tycker att vi ska gå nu", "Han tycker att jag är ful" etc.


Hoppas du förstod min förklaring!

Hejdå!

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com