Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Elin: Hej allihopa! I’m Elin.
Becky: Hi everyone, I’m Becky. Welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 7 - Making Lunch Plans in Swedish. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to form the pluperfect tense.
Elin: The conversation takes place at Emma’s office.
Becky: It’s between Emma and her employee Simon, and they’re using informal Swedish, since they work together.
Elin: Great! Let's listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: It looks like Emma and Simon are heading out to have some lunch. Tell me Elin, do Swedes often go out for lunch?
Elin: Well I wouldn’t say that it’s uncommon to eat out in Sweden, and the bigger cities definitely have a lot of options price-wise and food variations, but it’s probably more common to bring your own lunch box to eat at work.
Becky: I see, and is that because it’s too expensive to eat out?
Elin: That’s probably one of the reasons that people bring their lunch boxes, and recent studies have shown that people who are more educated go out to eat their lunch, compared to people with less education.
Becky: Might there be any other explanations?
Elin: It might also have to do with the fact that in the last couple of years, Swedes have been taking shorter breaks, so lunch boxes are a more convenient alternative.
Becky: That’s interesting! Now let’s move on to the vocabulary.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Elin: The first word we need to have a closer look at is the verb “att följa med” and it means “to come with”.
Becky: I remember that one, it’s used by Emma in this lesson’s dialog, when she says, “have you asked Anna if she want to come with us”.
Elin: Yes, that’s right, and it was, “har du frågat Anna, om hon vill följa med”.
Elin: The reason we need to talk a bit more about this verb, is that it can also be translated as the verbs “to follow” or “to accompany”.
Becky: Okay, that’s good to know! How would you say, “It’s difficult for me to follow the lesson” in Swedish?
Elin: That’s “jag har svårt att följa med på lektionen”.
Becky: I see. And how would you say, “I’m going to accompany Anna to the dentist”?
Elin: Then you would say, “jag ska följa med Anna till tandläkaren”.
Becky: Great! Are there any other words or phrases that we need to talk about?
Elin: Yes! I would also like to talk a bit about the expression “vad synd” which means “what a shame”.
Becky: And that was used by Emma in this lesson’s dialog, when she found out that Anna wouldn’t be joining her and Simon for lunch.
Elin: That’s right! And in a previous lesson, we also came across a similar expression, “så synd”, which translates as “what a pity”.
Becky: I remember that one!
Elin: Ok. I think both these expression are really good to know and use when you want to communicate that something you just heard is regrettable.
Becky: Listeners, try to remember these! And now, let’s move on to the grammar!
GRAMMAR POINT
Elin: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to form the pluperfect tense.
Becky: The pluperfect tense is used to form sentences where we want to communicate that an action was completed before something else happened. For example, in the dialog when Emma says, “ I had just made all the calls that I needed to, before you knocked on the door”.
Elin: In Swedish, that was “jag har precis ringt alla telefonsamtal som jag behövde, innan du knackade på dörren”.
Becky: Okay so now we understand the purpose of the pluperfect tense, but how do we form it?
Elin: Good question! The pluperfect tense in Swedish is always formed with the auxiliary verb “hade” meaning “had”, together with a main verb in its supine form.
Becky: Ahh the supine form. I remember that we covered the supine in a previous series, but I’m not really sure how to form it.
Elin: Ok, let’s review how to make the supine form for the three groups of verbs that are conjugated regularly.
Becky: Sounds like a good idea! What can you tell us about the first group of verbs that are conjugated regularly?
Elin: Here, you have verbs with a stem ending in an –a, “a”.
Becky: And how do we change them into their supine form?
Elin: You simply add a, “t”, to the stem of the verb. So for the verb “betala”, meaning “pay”, you just add a –t to the end. So “betala” meaning “pay” becomes, “betalat” meaning “paid” and in pluperfect tense that becomes “hade betalat” or “had paid”.
Becky: That wasn’t too difficult! But let’s get our listeners to practice that one! Listeners, repeat after Elin.
Elin: “betala” [pause], “betalat”[pause], “hade betalat”[pause].
Becky: Ok, and how about the next group of verbs?
Elin: For the second group of verbs that follow a regular conjugation, it’s a bit more complicated. The verbs belonging to this group all have a stem that ends in a consonant, but there are actually two sub-groups.
Becky: I remember that. The first subgroup contain verbs with a short stem vowel that either ends in a –t or a –d.
Elin: That’s right, and to change these into their supine form, you simply drop the –t or –d and add the ending –t.
Becky: Do you have an example?
Elin: Of course, the Swedish verb for “använd” meaning “use” changes to “andvänt” meaning “used” and the pluperfect tense is “hade använt” meaning “had used”. Listeners repeat after me.
Elin: “Använd”[pause], “andvänt”[pause], “hade använt” (had used).
Becky: And for the second subgroup, we have verbs with a long stem vowel that end in a –d.
Elin: That’s right! And to change these into their supine form, you simply drop the ending –d add and a double “t”, –tt.
Becky: Any examples?
Elin: Yes, the verb “blöd” meaning “bleed” changes to “blött” meaning “bled”, and in its pluperfect tense it becomes “hade blött” meaning “had bled”. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Blöd”[pause], “blött”[pause], “hade blött”[pause].
Becky: And lastly, how about the third group of verbs with regular conjugations?
Elin: The third group of verbs have a stem that ends in a consonant other than –a.
Becky: Right! And to create the supine form of these verbs, you simply add the ending –tt, double “t” to the stem of the verb. Elin, do you have an example of a verb that belongs to this group?
Elin: Sure! The verb “bo” meaning “live” belongs to this group and becomes “bott” meaning “lived” in its supine form and “hade bott” meaning “had lived” in its pluperfect tense. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Bo”[pause], “bott”[pause], “hade bott”[pause].
Becky: I’m glad we reviewed that, but now let’s talk about sentences that use the pluperfect tense. The first example was the sentence, “Anna had just cleaned, when Peter came home”.
Elin: Yes and that was, “Anna hade precis städat, när Peter kom hem”.
Becky: What can you tell us about that sentence?
Elin: Well, it’s a sentence that contains two clauses - a main clause and a subordinate clause.
Becky: The main clause is “Anna had just cleaned”, right?
Elin: Yes, that’s right! It was “Anna hade precis städat”. And it’s in the main clause where the pluperfect tense is used, because that’s where you find the auxiliary verb “hade” meaning “had” and the supine form of the verb “städat” meaning “cleaned”.
Becky: Okay, and how about the subordinate clause, “when Peter came home?
Elin: The subordinate clause “när Peter kom hem” is the clause that describes the action that takes place after what was described in the main clause has been completed.
Becky: I see, so in this example, Peter doesn’t come home, before Anna has cleaned?
Elin: Precisely!
Becky: Okay, let’s have our listeners practice that sentence one time. Listeners repeat after Elin!
Elin: “Anna hade städat, när Peter kom hem”.
Becky: How about another example?
Elin: Sure!
Becky: How would you say, ”Anders had just washed up when the telephone rang”?
Elin: You’d start with the main clause containing the auxiliary verb “hade” which means “had” and the supine form of the verb “wash up”, which is diskat. So “Anders had just washed up” becomes “Anders hade precis diskat”.
Becky: And how about the subordinate clause, “when the telephone rang”?
Elin: That in Swedish is, “när telefonen ringde”. So altogether, “Anders had just washed up when the telephone rang” becomes “Anders hade precis diskat när telefonen ringde”. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Anders hade precis diskat när telefonen ringde”.
Becky: Ok listeners, make sure you check the lesson notes if you are confused about any of the details from this lesson!

Outro

Becky: Okay that’s it for this lesson. Thanks for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time.
Elin: Hej då!

7 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Are you a very busy person or do you have time to have lunch with friends and coworkers?

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Team SwedishPod101.com
Tuesday at 7:46 pm
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Hej Alan,

The verbs can be quite tricky in Swedish. Let us know if you have any questions! 😇


VickyT

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Alan
Monday at 4:19 am
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Hoppsan!

The third group of verbs is the one that has a stem that end in a --consonant-- other than -a. Vowel! 😳

[Upper Beginner, #7, Lesson Notes]

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SwedishPod101.com
Saturday at 9:06 pm
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Hejsan Yolande!


Bra fråga!

Vi kan säga "en bitande kyla" om riktigt kallt väder.

Men vi säger "vargavinter" om en riktigt kall vinter! Så det liknar franskan lite! :innocent:


Vi ses!

Engla

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Yolande Brunelle
Sunday at 3:33 am
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Hej,

Jag har gott om tid för att träffa mina vänner, men jag har få vänner.

Jag är en ensamperson.


På franska man säger: Det är en vargs köld. "it is bitterly cold".

Finns det en folkuttryck på svenska för en bitande iskall temperatur?


Tackar. Hejdå,

Yolande

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SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 1:15 pm
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Hej Ruba!


Det är bättre att säga "prov" eller "tenta" :thumbsup:

Vi använder inte ordet "exam" i svenskan.


Ha det bra!

Engla

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ruba
Monday at 8:20 pm
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Hej allihopa!


Ibland kan jag vara upptagen när jag har exam, men jag vill gärna gå ut med mina kompisar.


Ha det bra!

Ruba