Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Elin: Hej allihopa! I’m Elin.
Becky: Hi everyone, I’m Becky. Welcome back to SwedishPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 8 - Where in Sweden Do Apples Come From? In this lesson you’ll continue to learn how to switch indefinite singular nouns into their plural forms, in the fourth and fifth declensions.
Elin: The conversation takes place at Emma and David’s apartment.
Becky: It’s between Emma and her daughter Elsa, and they are using informal Swedish, since they are family.
Elin: Great! Let's listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Wow, it sure sounds nice to have a fruit tree in your backyard. Elin, is it common for people to have fruit trees in their gardens in Sweden?
Elin: Yes I would say that it’s pretty common for Swedes who have their own garden to also have, for example, apple trees, pear trees and plum trees.
Becky: And what do they do with all these fruit?
Elin: Well, except for just enjoying the fruit as it is, many Swedes use the fruit to make things like cider, jam and cakes.
Becky: That sounds delicious!
Elin: Yes it sure does. But all this ripe fruit can also be a temptation, and it’s quite common among children and young people to steal the fruit.
Becky: Stealing the fruit?
Elin: Yes, and the activity of stealing fruit from people’s trees is so common that it actually has its own verb, “att palla” meaning “to steal”, but only used when referring to the stealing of fruit.
Becky: Wow, that’s very interesting! Now, let’s move on to the vocab.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Elin: The first word that we need to talk about is “farmor”.
Becky: And that means “grandmother” right?
Elin: Yes, it does mean “grandmother”, but it actually also has a more specific meaning.
Becky: I’m not sure I follow...What do you mean?
Elin: Well the noun “farmor” means the grandmother from you father’s side of the family.
Becky: I see. So what word would you use for your grandmother from your mother’s side of the family?
Elin: Then you would use the word “mormor”.
Becky: Oh, I see! Does this mean that there are also two words for the word “grandfather”?
Elin: That’s right! For your grandfather from you father’s side of the family, you would say, ”farfar”.
Becky: And for you grandfather from your mother’s side of the family?
Elin: He is “morfar”.
Becky: Got it! What’s the next word?
Elin: I would also like to mention the word “trädgård”, which appears in this lesson’s dialog.
Becky: And that translates to, “garden” right?
Elin: Yes it does in more natural English, but if you translated it literally, it would mean “tree garden”.
Becky: And this word is used when we talk about the area surrounding someone’s house?
Elin: That’s right, but sometimes Swedes only say “gård” instead of “trädgård”.
Becky: Ok, I’ll try to remember them both! Now let’s move on to the grammar!
GRAMMAR POINT
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to switch indefinite singular nouns into their plural forms, in the fourth and fifth declensions.
Elin: Let’s start with some nouns belonging to the fourth declension.
Becky: Sure, but is there something that we need to know about the fourth declension?
Elin: Glad you asked! Yes, the fourth declension contains a very small portion of all nouns, and they are neuter gender nouns that end in an unstressed vowel, that’s most commonly an “e”.
Becky: And how would you change these verbs from their indefinite singular to their indefinite plural?
Elin: That’s quite easy in fact, you simply add an –n, “n”, to the end.
Becky: That sounds easy! Do you have any examples for our listeners?
Elin: Of course, the word “äpple” meaning “apple” that appeared in this lesson’s dialog, belongs to the fourth declension. So “äpple”, becomes “äpplen”.
Becky: Let’s get our listeners to practice that. Listeners, repeat after Elin!
Elin: “äpple”[pause] “äpplen”[pause].
Becky: Any other examples?
Elin: The noun “bankkonto” meaning “bank account” belongs to the fourth declension, and follows the same pattern of adding an –n to form the indefinite plural form.
Becky: So how would you say “bank accounts” in Swedish?
Elin: “Bankkonto”, becomes “bankkonton”. Listeners, repeat after me!
Elin: “Bankkonto”[pause] “bankkonton”[pause].
Becky: Should we move on to the nouns belonging to the fifth declension now?
Elin: Yes, but before we do that, we also need to mention that there are a few nouns in the fourth declension that are irregular, such as the noun “öra” meaning “an ear”, “huvud” meaning “a head” and “öga” meaning “an eye”.
Becky: And what do they sound like in their indefinite plural form?
Elin: “öron” (ears), “huvuden” (heads), “ögon” (eyes).
Becky: I guess you just have to memorize those!
Elin: Yes, I think that’s a good idea! Now, let’s move on to the fifth and final declension!
Becky: Ok, what can you tell us about the fifth declension?
Elin: Most of the nouns belonging to the fifth declension are neuter gender nouns, that end in a consonant.
Becky: And how do we change them from their indefinite form to their indefinite plural form?
Elin: Well that’s the great news! They don't change - nouns belonging to the fifth declension are identical in their indefinite singular form and their indefinite plural form.
Becky: Wow, that *is* great news! But do you have some examples of nouns belonging to this declension?
Elin: Of course! You have nouns like “träd” meaning “a tree”, “hus” meaning “a house” and “namn” meaning “a name”.
Becky: Okay, so if I were to say “five trees”, “four houses” and “three names” in Swedish?
Elin: Then you would say, ”fem träd”, “fyra hus” and “tre namn”.
Becky: Great! Let’s have our listeners practice that! Listeners, repeat after Elin!
Elin: ”Fem träd”[pause], “fyra hus” [pause], “tre namn”[pause].
Becky: Is there anything else that we need to know about the fifth declension?
Elin: Yes, it might be good to know that there are some common gender nouns that also belong to the fifth declension, that denote people.
Becky: Such as?
Elin: Nouns like “läkare” meaning “doctor” and “lärare” meaning “teacher”.
Becky: And these also stay the same in their indefinite plural form?
Elin: Yes, “two doctors” in Swedish is “två läkare” and “three teachers” is “tre lärare”.
Becky: Listeners repeat after Elin!
Elin: “två läkare”[pause] ,“tre lärare”[pause].
Becky: Ok. Make sure you check the lesson notes if you still have questions about this grammar.

Outro

Becky: Okay that’s it for this lesson. Thanks for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time.
Elin: Hej då!

9 Comments

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SwedishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi listeners! What is your favorite fruit? Try saying it in Swedish using the plural form!

Team SwedishPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:42 pm
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Hej Margareta,


I'm not sure we have an exact translation, but the one that we would mostly use would be: "Jag hoppas att det låter vettigt" (I hope that makes sense). 😇


VickyT

Team SwedishPod101.com

Margareta
Tuesday at 10:21 pm
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Hur säger man "I hope it makes sense to you" på svenska?

Swedishpod101.comVerified
Monday at 11:35 pm
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Hi Erika,


Just as you say, when we send a formal letter that is meant for a single person we say "Till den det berör". Thank you for your comment and have a nice day.


VickyT

Team Swedispod101.com

Erika
Sunday at 6:04 am
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Hi Yolande,

We say "Till den som det berör."

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 9:12 pm
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Hej Yolande!


"To whom it may concern"

Till berörda parter


Vi använder dock inte detta uttryck så mycket!


Jag gillar också äpplen! Jag brukar baka äppelpaj på dem! :innocent:


Ha det bäst!

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

SwedishPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 9:10 pm
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Hejsan seohui!


Good observation! Hungrige can also be used, since we are talking about a man!

We can say "den hungriga mannen" also, but we cannot say "den hungrige kvinnan".


e-ending is masculine

a-ending is feminine or unisex


I hope it makes sense to you!

Engla

Team SwedishPod101.com

Yolande Brunelle
Monday at 3:30 am
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Hej Engla,

Hur säger man "To whom it may concern" på svenska.


Persikarna, päronen, körsbären, jordgubbarna och bananerna är jättegoda.

Men jag föredrar äpplen, i synnerhet McIntosh och Lobo äpplen.

Jag tror inte att det är vildäpplen här.

Ha det bra, hejdå Engla,

Yolande

seohui
Tuesday at 10:24 pm
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Den hungrige mannen letar efter mat i kylskåpet

in this sentence, I'm confused about hungrige.

isn't it hungriga? the variation is.. hungrig, hungrigt, hungriga


alltid tack^ ^